Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 21 Sep 2017, 10:35

I went up to my station last night but didn't play radio until later. I just listened to the local net on 2M FM while I was making some little brackets for our Jacks kitchen. for fixing the infill section in the base unit under the sink, didn't have anything small enough for the fixing so easier to make what I needed.
I called into the net when I had finished just as most other stations were signing off. Another friend Fred called in and we had a good hour discussing Li-Ion and Lipo battery technology and what was available. I may change tack on the battery arrangement for my C58. I am looking at the options for manufacturing a custom battery stack from individual cells, it would be a better option than the NiMh AA set in the holders. Lithium Ion or Lithium Polymer batteries are a lot more resilient and is the battery type used in power tools, mobile phones, laptops, and tablets.

I have plenty of uses for the AA NiMh batteries that I bought.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Big Kev » 21 Sep 2017, 16:23

We may have to have a chat regarding power tool batteries. I'm looking to replace the cells in a cordless drill.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by plaques » 21 Sep 2017, 18:15

Kev. If you ever find out how to do it using single replaceable cells let me know. These tend to be a different design to what is on the market as a consumable item. They also tend to be spot welded in series which doesn't help home construction. Living in hope.

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 21 Sep 2017, 18:59

The ones I am contemplating are the 18650 3.7v 2500mA. These are 18mm dia and 65mm long. these are a cell type package but Fred said that there are some Li-Ion types manufactured in a flat pack type enclosure. Not found any of these in the searches I have done so far. The 18650's are a common type used in Laptop's and other larger battery powered equipment. Arranged in series to increase the voltage and also parallel stacks to multiply the current handling. My main HF transceiver can be operated on battery and has provision for two battery packs to be fitted, mine was fully populated when I bought it although one is faulty and will no longer hold charge. This could be due to just an odd cell in the stack but involves pulling it apart to check. They should give 11.1v at 5000mA which is 6 cells arranged as two parallel stacks of 3 cells each in series. The battery cavity in my portable transceiver is 78mm x 60mm x 28mm with a quick measure up. Plenty of room to put three in series for 2.5A and maybe parallel another three although that might be a bit tight. The transceiver was originally fitted with 700mA ni-cads and will run on any voltage between 9v and 16v. On transmit the transceiver draws 600ma and around 100ma on receive so typically gave about 90 minutes of use on a single charge. Fitting three Li-Ion batteries will push that up to over 5 hours.

Samsung 18650 Li-Ion

Samsung make a 3400mA version of the cell also.
Ian

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 22 Sep 2017, 03:16

:biggrin2:
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Tizer » 02 Mar 2018, 10:02

Ian might glean some interest out of this...now I know what a Squawk 7700 alert is! The link doesn't explain why the aircraft put out an alert but it's interesting to know how they do it.
`This is why a Royal Air Force Hercules plane declared emergency over waters near Somerset' LINK

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 02 Mar 2018, 10:14

Despite the headline,the article doesn't actually give the reason for the alert because the RAF won't say. Interesting, it will be filed in report and then buried, investigate in 30 or maybe 50 years and you may be able to get an answer.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 03 Mar 2018, 04:31

:good:
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Tizer » 11 Jun 2019, 10:39

Tizer wrote:
30 May 2019, 16:03
I heard someone say that American Morse is different to European. Is that correct?
I posted that question in a different thread back at the end of May and got a couple of replies from Ian (of course!) but we didn't get any further with the American connection. I remembered today and had a look on Wikipedia. Apparently the phrase `American Morse Code' refers to the original version which was different to what we use now. The page about it is here: American Morse Code

What triggered all this was me listening to a short radio piece by Tim Harford about the history of the typewriter and he said one of the theories for how the qwerty key layout trumped others is that it suited the telegraph operators at the time in the US who were using the American version of Morse Code.

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 11 Jun 2019, 11:41

Interesting Tiz. I had no idea about this as I have never looked into the actual history other than knowing that the genus was developed by Samuel Morse originally for the telegraph widely used to cover the distances in the USA. Looking at it now compared to International Morse it looks almost unworkable with it relying on different spacings and even the lengths of the dashes (dahs). International Morse regularised the duration of the dots, dashes and spacing which all remain constant only the number of dots and dashes and their particular sequence varies in what is Internationally adopted now. It is the latter version that is all I have ever known thankfully.

One dash is equal to the length of three dots. letters within words are spaced with the equivalent of one dot, words are spaced by the equivalent of one dash. All letters are made up of up to four dots an dashes. Numbers are use five and common punctuation are made up of between four and six dots or dashes. All character and word spacing remains constant.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Tizer » 11 Jun 2019, 16:00

I'm glad you found it of interest. These nuggets pop out now and then in searches! :smile:

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 12 Jun 2019, 02:03

We don't half cover the ground!
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Weller DS3105

Post by SD150 » 24 Nov 2019, 10:58

Hi Guys,
I have a Weller DS801 with a DS3105 head. Recently I noticed that the pump was running all the time when I turned it on. After much scratching of heads I have stripped the head. Because, when just the 6 pin din plug and cable with bare ends is plugged in, the pump runs I measured the cable with an ohmeter. There seems to be less than 1k between the thicker cores which connect to the element and the switch. The thinner 2 cores seem to be open circuit which is what i would expect with all cores. Does anyone have any ideas on this? Has anyone found a circuit diagram of this unit which would help a great deal in getting it working again?

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 24 Nov 2019, 11:47

Welcome to the site.

I have the same kit but the head unit on mine is physically broken and I had to do a major Araldite job on it to get any sort of functionality out of it. The actuator switch was broken as well so I had to arrange a workaround for that. My unit had been in storage for nearly 20 years and I only needed use of it to effect a filter replacement repair on my Yeasu transceiver. I know when I was struggling with my head unit I searched high and low over the internet for a diagram to no avail so had to just do the best I could. You may have read earlier in the thread that I had to use a combination of desoldering techniques to get the job done. If the Weller kit had been fully functional it would have been a lot easier, It really needs a new head unit but is not worth replacing for the amount of usage that the desolder station would get now.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 25 Nov 2019, 07:08

I love these Chinese posts! Don't understand a word but I like to know that others do!
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 28 Feb 2020, 15:08

PanBiker wrote:
21 Sep 2017, 18:59
The ones I am contemplating are the 18650 3.7v 2500mA. These are 18mm dia and 65mm long. these are a cell type package but Fred said that there are some Li-Ion types manufactured in a flat pack type enclosure. Not found any of these in the searches I have done so far. The 18650's are a common type used in Laptop's and other larger battery powered equipment. Arranged in series to increase the voltage and also parallel stacks to multiply the current handling. My main HF transceiver can be operated on battery and has provision for two battery packs to be fitted, mine was fully populated when I bought it although one is faulty and will no longer hold charge. This could be due to just an odd cell in the stack but involves pulling it apart to check. They should give 11.1v at 5000mA which is 6 cells arranged as two parallel stacks of 3 cells each in series. The battery cavity in my portable transceiver is 78mm x 60mm x 28mm with a quick measure up. Plenty of room to put three in series for 2.5A and maybe parallel another three although that might be a bit tight. The transceiver was originally fitted with 700mA ni-cads and will run on any voltage between 9v and 16v. On transmit the transceiver draws 600ma and around 100ma on receive so typically gave about 90 minutes of use on a single charge. Fitting three Li-Ion batteries will push that up to over 5 hours.

Samsung 18650 Li-Ion

Samsung make a 3400mA version of the cell also.
Medical matters got in the way of taking my 2m Moxon antenna up Weets and so no reason at the time to upgrade the batteries in my C58 transceiver. Clear of that now so I have recently taken delivery of these:

Image

18650 3.7v 2500mA Lion, these are manufactured by Samsung so a decent brand.

I got this Nitecore charger at the same time as Lion batteries need a specific charging routine. The charger can handle up to four cells at once and can charge multiple types of battery at the same time. It has built in detection for battery type, over voltage and current protection and overheat protection. It analyses each cell and sets the correct charge rate, constant current or constant voltage mode as required and has auto shut off when each cell is charged.

Image

Here it is out of it's box. The unit can also charge LiFePo4 (Lithium Polymer) type batteries although the mode for those has to be manually selected. The charger has two multifunction buttons on the side for monitoring the progress of each charge channel or setting manual parameters. It can run on 240v mains or from a 12v 1A DC supply.

Image

I tested it charging the three 18650's and it completed a full charge of all three in 2.5 hours.

Image

Here it is charging, it is supplying 375mA to each of the individual cells at the correct charge voltage. The buttons allow you to cycle through all the information for each channel during or after completion of charging. If you insert a faulty cell it indicates the failure on the display. Once I was happy with its performance I replaced the EU 2pin plug with a three pin ring main plug so I don't have to use an adaptor.

I am just waiting for delivery of a triple cell battery holder for the 18650's this should fit in the battery compartment of the transceiver and give 11.1v at 2500mA

I have it charging a selection of various NiMh batteries that I have at the moment.

I might have a look to see if I can gain entry into the faulty battery pack that I have for my main Yaesu FT897 transceiver to see if I can repair it. I think there may be a YouTube video out there somewhere with tips.
Ian

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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Tripps » 28 Feb 2020, 15:53

Interesting Ian thanks for the info. I'd not come across these batteries before. I was very keen on rechargeable batteries at one time, but now since most devices have their own built in batteries I don't use them any more at all. I just keep a pack of alkaline ones for clocks and led torches. Interesting that the voltage is 3.7 volts as opposed to 1.2v for the ones I used to use. Means they are no good to replace an AAA cell.

I think I'd call the FT897 mobile rather than portable. Good luck taking it up Weets. :smile:
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 28 Feb 2020, 17:06

These are the same batteries that they use in vaping pipes. Also in a lot of the LED torches. They are much bigger than AAA or AA. 18650, 18mm dia x 65mm in length. You can get LiOn batteries in all sizes though including even larger cell types, 22650's and 26650's which are 3.7v but 5000mA.

My FT897D is a Base Station transceiver but it can be used mobile or truly portable with it's dual built in battery packs.

This set up is for my much smaller and 30 odd year old Standard C58 which is a 1W 2M (144-146MHz) multimode transceiver. It has a short "rubber duck" antenna for portable use as well as rear SO 239 socket for larger antennas. It also has a carry case and detachable shoulder strap. It has been up lots of hills in the past. I have a matching 25W linear amp for it but that needs a 7A supply so better run from a car battery or sealed lead acid or gel batteries.

RigPix Database - C58

RigPix Database - Yaesu FT897D
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 29 Feb 2020, 03:20

Once more, all Chinese to me but I love it.
This may be a good place to ask a question. Recognizing how much hand torch technology has moved on, (I am still using a rubber torch with three big ordinary batteries in it!), can anyone recommend a good LED hand torch that would go in an overcoat pocket and have better batteries than 3 AAAs?
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 29 Feb 2020, 09:26

There are thousands to choose from Stanley. I would go for a Multi-Led tactical style one myself. Make sure it is rechargeable and Lithium powered. A link below to get you started. Any of these types will knock spots off a triple AAA alkaline job. Many of them have adjustable beams so you can have flood or concentrated beam. See a lot of them on the campsites and they are quite spectacular in performance.

A lot of them use the same batteries as I have just got or the larger variants and have built in chargers so you just have a USB charging lead.

I have promised myself a couple for camping.

Amazon Examples
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 29 Feb 2020, 12:00

Thanks Ian. I just bought one.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 06 Mar 2020, 11:15

My battery holder for the 18650 batteries turned up, just have to fit it now. I have offered it up and it's what you would call an interference fit into the space available, one thing sure, I wont need to use any packing!

On another project, I have decided to install some mobile equipment into the car. If I want to use it truly mobile I will need some form of hands free microphone and PTT (push to talk) arrangement. I had a look round at the commercial products available and nothing was suitable or really took my fancy to buy and possibly modify to interface with my kit, expensive for the latter. So I have decided to repeat a similar setup that I used to have when I last had mobile kit in my car. I have ordered up the components to construct a custom arrangement. This will comprise a small condenser microphone on a thin boom from the sun visor. and a switch arrangement for transmit/receive, I'm hoping to install this on the steering wheel right hand spoke, the left hand spoke is already occupied by controls for the in car audio system. Need to find out how I get into the covers on the steering wheel. It has a steering wheel air bag but I shouldn't need to go near that!

I ordered the components at 10.45 last night from CPC who I have an account with. I received an email this morning to say that my order will be delivered today by UPS. Bits cost just over £10.00 so qualified for free delivery. The cheapest commercial product that I would need to modify and still end with a compromise in design would cost me £39.00 or thereabouts.

I took delivery last week of a new dual band (2M and 70cm) mobile transceiver. It's no bigger than my hand, Chinese manufacture and a bargain for the amount of tech and features at £89.00. Price includes a DTMF (Dual Tone Multi Frequency) microphone, mobile mounting bracket and a USB programming lead. 25w RF output so quite handy for mobile operation. I have it on my bench upstairs at the moment, I have programmed it up for Simplex operation on both bands and a full range of mobile repeater channels on 2M and 70cm's. I have include a couple of internet gateways for good measure, the transceiver has 200 memories so plenty of room to tweak as required. I will put a photo up when I start my mobile mic project.
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 07 Mar 2020, 03:02

Good job your hands weren't affected by the tumour Ian. Lots of fiddly bits to play with. That would be a nightmare for me....
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by PanBiker » 07 Mar 2020, 10:28

My right hand was! It will still be a challenge though as my eyes aren't what they used to be for close work. On the hands, my fingers didn't work on my right hand immediately post op, fine motor control damaged by the surgery coupled with numbness down my right side. I had to do hours of thumb to every finger and back again exercises and stretching and for the numbness, rubbing up and down my arm with different textured stuff. This could be anything from a feather to scrumpled up paper or a brush. Repetition desensitise the nerves. I had a game with the grandchildren, with my eyes closed they stroked my head and arm with something unknown and I had to guess what it was. :smile:

I'll manage though, the condenser microphone inserts that I ordered are only 5mm diameter and thy have two polarised connections, should be fun. :extrawink:
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Re: Amateur Radio Homebrew (Shack Culture)

Post by Stanley » 08 Mar 2020, 03:19

I know the feeling......
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