THE FLATLEY DRYER

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Stanley
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 08 Mar 2019, 07:50

You'll have a cannon to go with them shortly, I am getting better. I want to do the writing first!
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Wendyf » 08 Mar 2019, 07:53

It was thanks to you sharing their Facebook posts that I spotted the chairs Kev. :good:

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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Big Kev » 08 Mar 2019, 08:15

Wendyf wrote:
08 Mar 2019, 07:53
It was thanks to you sharing their Facebook posts that I spotted the chairs Kev. :good:
Glad to be of service :biggrin2: , I do like to encourage local businesses.
Kev

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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 09 Mar 2019, 04:26

The Diabetes nurse commented the other day what good shape my feet were in for the mileage (Once she had sauced me for not spending enough time getting them perfectly clean! I mean clinically clean and moisturised!).
I told her I put it down to genes and the fact that my mother was very good on making sure we had good well fitting boots and shoes. Probably influenced also by the fact she had a club foot due to what they called in those days, 'Infantile Paralysis'. She once told me that for years she had her foot rubbed with Neat's Foot Oil twice a day and she hated the smell of it.
Then there was the fact that from 1954 until I went in the engine house in 1972 I wore clogs with double irons.
Clogs are the best footwear in the world once you have got used to the fact that the soles don't bend. (I used to have what were called Fell Boots at one time and they were the same, no flexibility in the sole, they were made on a hinged last and you had to let your foot roll as you walked.) In effect you are walking on a polished wood floor all day. They never felt cold or wet as the thick soles kept you up off the ground and were good insulation. The wood was waterproof, it was Alder. I found there were other advantages as well, cows heard you coming and you seldom got kicked. And of course you could do your own repairs, fitting new irons. I still have irons, clog nails and the wooden pegs you filled the old nail holes up with.
I remember one day in Paisley two lasses commented on my 'build-ups', it was when that ridiculous fashion for very thick soles was all the rage. I once delivered some cattle to a farm in Surrey and the kids were fascinated with them. I had to take them off and let them try them out, they had a whale of a time tottering about the yard and couldn't understand how I walked or drove in them. I told them that they were fine once you were used to them.
When I went in the engine house they were no good on the steel floor plates and I hated rubber irons so I went back into boots......
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 10 Mar 2019, 06:01

I remember being under a wagon in the rain doing an essential repair on it and it occurred to me that the day was fast approaching when I wouldn't be able to do this any more, I needed a career change that kept me clean and dry! I had very little idea of what this was going to be and the process of arriving there was hard work and often painful. I often comment on the way change has affected our lives and in my case this was the key moment. I suppose we all have them and so the object this morning that equates to the Flatley Dryer is the way our lives used to be and what changed them! Looking back, I did all the right things and I hope all of you can report the same about your personal life changes......
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 11 Mar 2019, 05:00

I was watching an antiques programme on TV and was reminded of 'Film Stips'

Image

I couldn't find a description on tinternetwebthingy but one of the viewers was for sale on Ebay. Just like the one I had in the 1950s..... Anybody else ever have one?
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 12 Mar 2019, 04:58

Funny how things come into your head. For some reason I remembered a sequel (or rather a prequel) to our conversation the other day about the Tomato Dip café at Sandbeds. Tomato dip originated in the practice of slow cooking tinned chapped tomatoes and spices until it reduced and then using it to dip the bread in that was used for bacon butties and the first 'Tomato Dip' café I ever saw was in Bradford. This was before the one at Skipton. The practice must have been widespread but that was the first I saw.
Only a small thing but a little bit of history!
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 13 Mar 2019, 04:32

One thing I clearly remember is that when I was a lad there was no such thing as 'hair styling' for men. The standard cut was 'short back and sides and a bit off the top'. The big thing for women was the 'Eugene Permanent Wave'. (LINK) There was a salon next to the school on Heaton Moor and the advertisements in the window fascinated me. The result was very artificial looking and from what my mother told me the process was long, painful and quite dangerous in unskilled hands! Many women had it done and during the week and at night protected the waves by wearing a turban. If you see wartime pics of factory workers all the woman wore them even if they had no 'perm'. It kept the hair clean and out of moving machinery!
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 14 Mar 2019, 07:01

A morning like this morning makes me wonder how we survived over 70 years ago. I came back from half an hour out in horrible weather perfectly dry and warm. In those days it wasn't like that, the water repelling qualities of a top coat depended on its thickness. That meant that when you came home it was soaking wet and had to be dried before morning in a cold house with only one open fire. It didn't work of course and when you went out next morning it was in damp clothing. True, after the war there were army surplus 'gas capes' available which were waterproof but they were no good for serious work, especially if you were doing a job like picking up milk and jumping in and out of the cab continuously. In those days heavy rain on outdoor workers meant they were 'rained off' and retired to the site hut for a brew and a warm up. Today workers are issued with full waterproofs and expected to carry on. I suppose that's progress!
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 15 Mar 2019, 04:34

Reading the dialect topic this morning reminded me of the days when the weather forecast was read by announcers in Received Pronunciation which while it was stilted was perfectly clear. Not a surplus adjective to be heard, no 'soggy weather'.
That reminded me of Gillie Potter. (LINK) a broadcaster and comedian during the war who used to start his programmes by stating that he was Gillie Potter reporting from Hogsnorton in King's English. (George VI was still alive of course) It was very strange humour and many argued that 'common people' wouldn't be able to understand his humour as it was full of allusions to history and the classics. All I can say is that it didn't bother me and as a lad I used to enjoy listening to him.
Basically he was taking the piss out of the establishment in a very subtle way, perhaps we need something like that today.....
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 17 Mar 2019, 06:18

When I was a young lad my mother always took me with her when she went shopping in Stockport. My baby sister was generally left with a neighbour for these weekly expeditions. Looking back she was a good mother because by the time I went to school I was reading quite well. The way she did it mainly was by making me read the advertisements and the names of the shops on the frontages. I can still see the names 'Woolworths' and 'British Home Stores' on the big stores in Prince's Street. She encouraged me to look at other things as well, Hollindrake's Foundry which in those days was on Prince's Street, I can still see them pouring molten iron through the open door, it could never happen today. One of my early memories is watching the cranes working as they built Merseyway over the river, it opened in 1936, my birth year in February. Looking back she was encouraging me to look and learn and I am sure it has affected the whole of my life.
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 18 Mar 2019, 03:58

One of the most common cries for help I hear today is from adults who complain that they "don't understand teenagers". It strikes me that when I was a lad the adults in my life were far more memorable and influential than my peers. I've always thought that this was perhaps something different about me but I begin to think that there is perhaps another reason. We didn't have 'Youf Culture' then, at first largely because we weren't seen as a market, a section of the population that could be targeted profitably by advertising. Add the growing influence of electronic culture over the years and you get to where we are now, a stage where kids can fill the gaps in their lives without any reliance on adults, including their parents. Is this why they seem to have developed their own culture which includes dropping litter and regarding anybody old as superfluous to requirements? Or is this just my advancing years altering my perspective. On the whole I don't think it is the latter, we had respect for the elders and even now it still persists in some cultures. I remember when I first met the Greek extension to my family how the young ones used to almost stand to attention when speaking to me. I remember how striking this was and commented at the time.... (It wasn't just because I was a stranger, they did the same with the old Greek Uncles.)
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Tizer » 18 Mar 2019, 11:01

My impression is that we went through a period where respect of the very young for oldies hit a low point but we are seeing an upward, positive trend now. Of course, there are always some bad examples and unfortunately they tend to be more obvious than the good ones.

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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 19 Mar 2019, 04:11

It's thin on the ground in the teenagers I see on the street Tiz.
Can anyone remember the old Rawlplug inserts and the percussion drill you used to get a hole in the wall. Tungsten Carbide masonry drills were a wonderful innovation!
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Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 20 Mar 2019, 05:07

Image

Talking about drilling holes in stone reminded me of 'star drills'. These used to be the only way of drilling large holes in stone, in general building work but even more common in quarries for drilling shot holes or the series of holes that were used for splitting large rocks with 'Plugs and Feathers'.
You hit the end with a heavy hammer, rotate it slightly and hit it again. Slow but steady, each blow broke up a small amount of rock in the bottom of the hole. The same shape of bit was used when pneumatic rock drills were introduced in the Cornish mining industry. Using them by hand was slow and laborious and the harder the stone the slower the cut. You could lose the will to live!
Two stories involving star drills for you. First is when I was installing central heating at Hey farm. The walls were two feet thick, even the interior ones and I had to make holes big enough to take 3/4" copper pipe. Many of the old buildings have a course of Blue Limestone in the base as it is a waterproof rock, it's as hard as the hobs of hell. I was drilling a hole and every time I struck the drill I got dull red sparks from the edge, not good. Billy Entwistle visited and came to look at what I was doing. He told me to forget the drill, dig down into the soil at the base of the wall and find the bottom edge of the stone. Evidently in the old houses they didn't bother about deep footings. I did what he said and poked a hole out under the wall in the soil. That was good advice.
The other story is about Brown and Pickles. Johnny Pickles had made the clock for the new Catholic Church and his men were on a scaffold in the chancel drilling a hole through the end wall for the drive spindle for the clock hands on the outside face. Johnny called in to see how they were going on and caught them swearing at the stone, they were cutting with a star drill as it was hard going. He stood there in the chancel with his bowler hat on and a fag hanging out of the corner of his mouth and reminded them "Stop that swearing! Remember you're in a bloody church!"
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