THE FLATLEY DRYER

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 13 Apr 2019, 02:18

I couldn't agree more Ian. During the war at Hope Memorial school in Stockport in winter we used to put the crates in the hearth of the enormous fireplace in the one big classroom. It had a big coke fire in it and was a lovely and warm. Modern safety would never allow it today and they don't know what they are missing. As for putting the milk in the hearth to warm! Can you imagine the reaction to that today...
By the way, no foil tops, they were wide mouth bottles with the waxed cardboard tops with the push out in the middle for inserting a straw.
The only fault I ever found with the system when I was delivering was that the bottles were never washed. They should have taught the kids to swill the bottles out after drinking the milk. When you delivered the first milk after a holiday the bottles had been standing right through the holidays without washing out and they stank! They were a bit of a problem at the dairy as well. I have an idea we washed them twice, even the hot caustic solution used in the washers couldn't get them sterile with one pass....
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
PanBiker
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
Posts: 8595
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 13:07
Location: Barnoldswick - In the West Riding of Yorkshire, always was, always will be.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by PanBiker » 13 Apr 2019, 09:02

With the foil tops, If you were careful taking the top off fully rather than poking a straw through it. The tops made great flying saucers, you could hold the side between your forefinger and middle finger and get them to fly with a quick flick of your fingers. I seem to remember the orange juice had gold tops on.
Ian

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 14 Apr 2019, 02:36

The wax tops made good formers for making woollen Pom-poms....
The school dinners came in insulated aluminium boxes, I remember them as well.
I had a key to the fridge as I had to load at about 3AM. One day 24 gallons of cream went missing and I was suspect because I was there on my own so early. I pointed out to the police that their theory of me pinching cream to make butter fell down once one realised there was ten tons of butter stacked in the same fridge.....
Not me guv.....
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 15 Apr 2019, 02:48

I've remembered it was sergeant Pearson that had the brilliant but flawed theory about me being the Phantom Cream Snatcher. Not a well liked man. If my memory serves me correctly he got into a spot of bother later and left under a cloud. We didn't miss him. Later we had a much more sensible sergeant and I remember once making a Citizen's Arrest of two lads who were breaking car headlights for fun, including mine.... I persuaded them to come to the police station on Manchester Road and they complained I had assaulted them. They went to court and had to pay restitution but let it be known they were out to get me. The sergeant used to pop in and sit drinking tea with me in King Street on Saturday night and one evening he asked me how I got on with the brothel almost next door in King Street. He laughed when I told him I had no idea it was there, I thought the lasses were just popular when they had lads calling. To the pure, all things are pure as they say. By the way, they never did 'get me'!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 16 Apr 2019, 03:30

In 1954 I had three days in Colchester Military Hospital (Yes, there were dedicated MHs in those days!) with an impacted Wisdom tooth and abscess. The reason I thought about it this morning was that the biggest problem in those days was recovering from the anaesthetic, it took over two days. Yesterday I was walking round (a bit unsteady) and eating toast an hour after coming back to the world.... They have improved things a bit!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 17 Apr 2019, 05:10

As a lad I remember that two family friends both managed large cinemas which were far more popular then in the days before TV. Mac Parker was the manager of the Carlton in Stockport, later changed to Essoldo. (The name was derived from the family names of the new owner, Essie, Soloman and Dorothy) Jack Brannand was manager of the Odeon in Didsbury. Cinema manager was quite a high status job in those days.
I remember Jack Brannand telling us that when they showed 'The Cruel Sea' they had to have St John's Ambulance Brigade on duty because so many people were seasick watching the film!
Another thing that imporessed me was the fact that Mac Parker had a fully uniformed member of the Corps of Commissionaires on the door. He opened the door for customers and welcomed them with a salute. I see from tinternetwebthingy that they still exist and claim to be the oldest security firm in the world.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
plaques
Donor
Posts: 3266
Joined: 23 May 2013, 22:09

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by plaques » 17 Apr 2019, 08:00

Raising ones hat as a sign of respect or courtesy used to be a common sight. It was almost considered as compulsory if a funeral cortège was passing. Today's men's fashion of no hats or beanie hats etc: have more or less cosigned this token of respect to the dustbin of history.

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 18 Apr 2019, 03:11

I still do it sometimes for effect, it surprises people so much. I also find that kissing a ladies hand has the same shock factor and is always welcome! (Old Smoothie tactics. If you really want to see a woman melt, drop on one knee before doing it!)
I always wear a hat. In my youth it was universal and in many ways a badge of rank. Foremen wore bowlers, the workers Cloth Caps and it was almost unthinkable to break this rule in the workplace.

Image

Johnny Pickles would have felt undressed without his bowler!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 19 Apr 2019, 04:24

Another big sartorial change in my lifetime has been in working clothes. (Include weekday clothes for us school kids.) Everyone had 'Sunday Best' outfits that were used for church, weddings and funerals etc. In the case of kids we often grew out of them but in adults, particularly working men, the Sunday Best became every day weekday wear. In some industries like cotton spinning there was recognised work wear. Incidentally it was a matter of pride between housewives that their husband's overalls were scrubbed and bleached until they were white! In other industries the Sunday suit became work wear. This was still true in the 1960s particularly the steel industry. I regularly saw melters and pourers in shabby suits (with the obligatory white silk scarf!) turning their backs as a pour took place and gobbets of molten iron and steel showering them. Today we have 'protective clothing' supplied by the management but in those days it was unheard of. One thing in particular I noted was that the foreman melters always had a pair of dark glasses as they had to watch the colour of the flames issuing from the converters to judge when it was time to shut down the blast and pour the metal. If for some reason they had to have a new pair it was a big problem as the tint of the new glasses was never exactly the same and they had to re-calibrate.
The first improvement was the advent of the boiler suit and then came good waterproofs and high viz clothing. I always thought that a big incentive for the management to provide outside workers with waterproofs was the fact that they could then give up the time-honoured practice of retiring to the site hut if 'rained off'. I don't think that happens these days....
Look again at the picture of Johnny yesterday. That suit was his work wear and was almost certainly a demoted Sunday Best suit.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 49393
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: THE FLATLEY DRYER

Post by Stanley » 20 Apr 2019, 05:18

Does anyone remember the enormous liquid filled magnifying screens that some people used to 'enhance' the experience of the tiny screens on the newfangled TV sets?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

Post Reply

Return to “Nostalgia”