DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 19 Dec 2017, 16:41

Anyone who has read Peter Tremayne's Sister Fidelma novels would probably know what a tanist is. :extrawink:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 20 Dec 2017, 04:30

I didn't until Norman explained it......
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 01 Jan 2018, 11:29

We enjoyed a radio programme on the history of perfumes. The name comes from the fact that they originated as odours carried in smoke as with incense and joss sticks. Obvious really but I'd not given it a thought before. :smile:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 02 Jan 2018, 04:28

I heard it and was surprised they never mentioned the book 'Perfume'. (LINK) A good read......
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 07 Jan 2018, 06:22

Funny how things pop into your head. My father used to have a saying; "Dry as a Heron" and it wasn't until i picked a dead Heron up that I realised the origin, they weigh nothing! I have always used other sayings, "Runs like a basketful of pots" was the stock description for a poorly engine. "Rough as bear's arse" is another favourite.... I wonder whether they are rough? There is usual a foundation of fact or truth to them.
Any more favourites?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Big Kev
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 2558
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 20:15
Location: Barlick

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Big Kev » 07 Jan 2018, 08:21

Silly as a wagon load of monkeys was used by my late mother in law, usually directed at anyone male.
One of my favourites is 'running like a three legged camel' when describing a misfiring engine.
Kev

A Resigned Observer

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 07 Jan 2018, 11:00

`Silly as a wagon load of monkeys' sounds about right for Trump. :smile:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Jan 2018, 04:15

I always associate monkeys with mischief. There used to be a pub in Accrington called 'The load of monkeys'.
Of an engine.... "Ticks over like a rice pudding".
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 08 Jan 2018, 10:25

I've been re-reading a Terry Pratchett book from the library and it turned out to be a US edition so I had to put up with all the different spellings. But I was caught out when one of the characters criticised another and called him a `pantywaist'. I had to look it up and found it's used in the US to refer to an adult who acts in a childish manner. It had me wondering what word was used in the original UK edition. Apparently the word originally meant a child's garment made of pants buttoned to a waistcoat top. Perhaps Donald Trump will be America's most famous pantywaist?

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Jan 2018, 03:35

Interesting, I've never come across that one. I can remember when vests buttoned to pants.....
Trump is way beyond simple descriptions like that.....
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tripps
Senior Member
Posts: 2988
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 14:56

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 10 Jan 2018, 11:47

There is ' a rat' in separate. With bit of luck I'll never write 'seperate' again. . . :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 15 Jan 2018, 06:11

There was a 'lull' in the rain this morning. Now where does that little word come from? Any connection with 'lullaby'?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 23 Jan 2018, 06:29

I know I am a pedant but I have just heard this on R4; "Deja vu all over again".
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Big Kev
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 2558
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 20:15
Location: Barlick

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Big Kev » 23 Jan 2018, 08:29

Stanley wrote:
23 Jan 2018, 06:29
I know I am a pedant but I have just heard this on R4; "Deja vu all over again".
Was it a comment or a reference to a John Fogerty album? :biggrin2:
Kev

A Resigned Observer

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 23 Jan 2018, 10:22

An item on the radio about English words mentioned one that sounded like `cuprius' but it didn't mean anything to me. Chemistry makes me familiar with cuprous and cupric, geology with cupriferous but I had to consult the dictionary on the radio word. I found cupreous which means `of or resembling copper' or `the colour of copper'. I think `coppery' would do the job OK! :smile:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 24 Jan 2018, 03:57

Memory fails Kev.....
Tiz, perhaps it was someone doing what I do occasionally, giving archaic words an airing. If so, I am all for it..... Norman used tergiversate in his book yesterday......
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Bodger
Senior Member
Posts: 1072
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:30
Location: Ireland

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 05 Feb 2018, 08:31

A word from my school days Nesh, someone wrapped up well on a cold day, whilst your'e in your shirt sleeves

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 06 Feb 2018, 05:08

I first heard that from my Birkenhead mates in the army Bodge. Used in Barlick as well.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Feb 2018, 05:42

I've just used the word 'Shrill'. As often happens it struck me it was a strange word and I wondered where it originated. Webster says that it is Middle English (1300-1350) 'skrille, akin to OE 'scralletan' to sound loudly. Also Old German 'schrille' and Old Norse 'skrill' meaning rabble.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

cloghopper
Regular User
Posts: 100
Joined: 02 Apr 2012, 16:39

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by cloghopper » 11 Feb 2018, 09:15

Greetings to all. Just logged in for the first time in a while, and found this thread very interesting. Languages and dialects are fascinating, and I find that in my dotage I am gradually going back to using a lot of dialect words from my youth, when I worked with my dad at Higher Reedly. This brought back to mind when I once met the governor of Wakefield jail, who could guess within a few miles where an inmate came from just by his accent, even if They were all Yorkshire men. Also made me remember the old sheep counting. Dad, and my uncles at Calf Hall and Tunstead used them.
cloggie-

User avatar
PanBiker
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
Posts: 7957
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 13:07
Location: Barnoldswick - In the West Riding of Yorkshire, always was, always will be.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by PanBiker » 11 Feb 2018, 10:04

Hello again Cloggy, nice to hear from you again. "Yan, Tan, Tether, Mether, Pimp, Sether, Heather, Hother, Dother, Dick". My dad used it on occasion, no real association with farming but his dad my grandfather had. He was a true dalesman, (Dent). Farmer, horseman, carter, we even have him as a tinker on one census when he went walkabout in Warwickshire and London for a while. When I heard it as a little lad, I was always taken with 10 and above, shared it with my mates as schoolboy humour ( as you would) in the playground. :extrawink: :biggrin2:
Ian

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 9763
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 11 Feb 2018, 10:31

I hope you both saw that northern sheep farmer on the TV who demonstrated the sheep counting. When he got to 20 he took a pebble out of his pocket and said "After 20 we use technology". :smile:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 46766
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 12 Feb 2018, 04:00

I like it.
Another word grabbed me yesterday, 'flurry'. Webster says it is 1680-1690 and American origin, a combination of flutter and hurry. Makes sense but slightly disappointing, I was expecting an old language origin!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

cloghopper
Regular User
Posts: 100
Joined: 02 Apr 2012, 16:39

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by cloghopper » 13 Feb 2018, 08:36

Tizer wrote:
11 Feb 2018, 10:31
I hope you both saw that northern sheep farmer on the TV who demonstrated the sheep counting. When he got to 20 he took a pebble out of his pocket and said "After 20 we use technology". :smile:
Ni, I haven't seen that. Many Nordic and Germanic languages don't have words for numbers over 20. Old English didn't 'five and twenty blackbirds' :smile:

cloghopper
Regular User
Posts: 100
Joined: 02 Apr 2012, 16:39

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by cloghopper » 13 Feb 2018, 08:42

PanBiker wrote:
11 Feb 2018, 10:04
Hello again Cloggy, nice to hear from you again. "Yan, Tan, Tether, Mether, Pimp, Sether, Heather, Hother, Dother, Dick". My dad used it on occasion, no real association with farming but his dad my grandfather had. He was a true dalesman, (Dent). Farmer, horseman, carter, we even have him as a tinker on one census when he went walkabout in Warwickshire and London for a while. When I heard it as a little lad, I was always taken with 10 and above, shared it with my mates as schoolboy humour ( as you would) in the playground. :extrawink: :biggrin2:
Thanks for that reminder. Knowing what I know now, it strikes me that they are an anglicised version of Welsh numbers from 1 to 10, except number 4, which in Welsh is pedwar.
Borra da,
cloggy

Post Reply

Return to “General Miscellaneous Chat & Gossip”