DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 07 Sep 2017, 02:32

:biggrin2:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by BillHowcroft » 07 Sep 2017, 17:44

Stanley used a term I had to Google - Jacob's Join. In Derby we'd probably call this a Fuddle.

Also we call alleyways & ginnels a jitty.

Other terms that vary round the country:
Sandwich bread rolls we call cobs not baps or barmcakes or breadcakes.
And do you mash stew, steep etc your tea - we have brew here.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by BillHowcroft » 07 Sep 2017, 21:56

Also an interesting piece in the BBC magazine about the dominance of American English:
http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201709 ... h-language
I didn't know that Americans hadn't heard of the term fortnight.
I work for an American company and they pay me fortnightly instead of monthly like my previous employers.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Sep 2017, 04:26

Let's hear it for the pedants! We mash in Barlick Bill.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by chinatyke » 09 Sep 2017, 14:51

Stanley wrote:
09 Sep 2017, 04:26
Let's hear it for the pedants! We mash in Barlick Bill.....
Really? They mash in Derby as well. We brewed in Colne.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 10 Sep 2017, 03:00

My understanding has always been that mashing tea is putting a small amount of boiling water on the leaves and leaving it to 'mash'. Later when you add the rest of the boiling water it brews and because of the mashing you get a more rounded flavour. Same thing works with ground coffee.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 10 Sep 2017, 13:10

I like the word 'cyberchondriacs' for people who self diagnose excessively on the internet. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 11 Sep 2017, 03:19

It used to be medical dictionaries, see 'Three Men in a Boat'.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bruff » 14 Sep 2017, 11:34

It’s the old joke about the chap who keeps going to the Dr’s and the Dr says he’s a hypochondriac, to which the chap replies: ‘Oh not that as well!’


‘’Sandwich bread rolls we call cobs not baps or barmcakes or breadcakes’’.

Bill – cobs in Leicester too, where I spent 3 years. There’s a thread on the topic of the different names for bread etc. that I started years ago (probably in the archive).

Here in Merseyside, you have nudgers, a torpedo-shaped roll, and bin-lids, a big flat ‘un. In Barlick I think it’s a teacake for the basic roll, and then current teacake for what a lot of places regard as a teacake. Barnsley is the same interestingly.

Plus, the writer and journalist Mathew Engel has written a book on American English: That’s the Way it Crumbles. If it’s like his other books, it’ll be a hoot and is on my list.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 15 Sep 2017, 03:19

That's right for Barlick Richard, plain and currant teacakes. I've heard the big flat ones called 'frisbees'. Then there is the whole question of oven bottom and lard cakes..... (That was a good thread, I remember it well!)
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 15 Sep 2017, 08:58

Used the term 'panned out' to mean tired and exhausted. This is not quite the same as to 'pan out'. Is this a local usage?

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by PanBiker » 15 Sep 2017, 09:01

Fagged out also.
Ian

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 16 Sep 2017, 02:50

My mother came from Dukinfield and she used to say she was 'powfagged'.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf » 16 Sep 2017, 08:11

I found myself thinking about the phrase "wrong footed" this morning, still used occasionally so I probably heard it on the radio. I wonder if it originates from the schooling of horses. If a horse is cantering in a straight line it doesn't matter which leg is leading, but if there is a bend he needs to be "striking off" on the inside leg or he cant bend and loses balance. One of the basic skills of riding is knowing the aids to tell the horse which leg you want him to canter on for an approaching bend or turn. If you get it wrong then he is on the wrong leg or "wrong footed" and out of balance. One of the skills of horse and rider in dressage is the "counter canter" circling on the wrong leg but maintaining balance. Another is the flying change, watch carefully next time you see a show jumper negotiating the twists and turns of a course!
I could be wrong of course. :smile:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 16 Sep 2017, 11:23

Thanks for that - really interesting. I've studied videos of horses gait, and still can't really fathom it. In fact the whole game is a bit of a mystery, but I stick at it. :smile:
In racing they call it changing legs and I was aware of it, but thought it just happened by chance during a race. I didn't realise it was so important.

Maybe I should have - I went to Newmarket a few weeks ago to watch some horses being trained. The trainer said that part of the education process was 'weaving' - just at a slow pace constantly changing direction. Not sure if they all do it, but he's one of a kind in many respects.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 17 Sep 2017, 03:12

Interesting, a whole new field I am ignorant about...... I shall resist the urge to study it in depth!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 17 Sep 2017, 07:13

A friend of mine always made a weekly contribution to sick and poorly horses, mind you he didn't know they were poorly until the race was over. Perhaps they hadn't been trained to move their legs in the right order.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf » 17 Sep 2017, 07:58

:biggrin2: Racehorses are a different kettle of fish, not much bending and twisting required!
Having looked it up I'm completely wrong, it's more to do with sport. :laugh5:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 18 Sep 2017, 04:14

I wonder if Dennis and Sparky know about this.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf » 18 Sep 2017, 05:52

Dennis does!

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 18 Sep 2017, 06:23

:biggrin2:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 27 Sep 2017, 10:32

The phrase 'anti semitic' has been used a great deal recently. interesting to see what the actual definition of semitic is. Seems it's all to do with language, and not race or religion.

semitic - definition
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 28 Sep 2017, 03:09

That's interesting.... I have always associated it with race rather than language....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 28 Sep 2017, 07:28

I was on another site yesterday related to Hyde Cheshire, there it was "pawming" day, ie. the day you go pawming about, or in other words go for a wander

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 28 Sep 2017, 08:38

Tripps wrote:
27 Sep 2017, 10:32
The phrase 'anti semitic' has been used a great deal recently. interesting to see what the actual definition of semitic is. Seems it's all to do with language, and not race or religion.
The use of the phrase anti-semitic has always puzzled me when it's used to mean anti-Jew because Arabs are semites too.

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