DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Jul 2018, 02:26

I second that!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 14 Jul 2018, 11:34

Found myself using the phrase 'Dressed to the nines'. I know its been used on this site before but why 'nines'?

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 14 Jul 2018, 18:25

The origin doesn't seem to be clear.

I thought immediately of British Army Uniforms, but of the fourteen or so categories, Number Nine seems to be Tropical Combat Dress, which would hardly be the smartest. So I think we can safely forget that explanation.

The smartest would surely be Mess Dress or Number Ten - 'dressed up to the tens' doesn't have the same ring to it does it? I've got one in my wardrobe - which I've been promising myself to dispose of since 1985, but it's still there - I'll do it one day. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 15 Jul 2018, 02:40

I tend to the school of thought that it is a superlative based on marks out of ten, so an excellent mark.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 17 Jul 2018, 09:46

The recent dry weather, with the fires on Saddleworth Moor, Winter Hill, and now (good heavens) in London at Wanstead Flats reminded me of the word 'sweeling' .

I can't find much reference to it via google - the only one which pertains to burning is Sweel / Sweal

Regular summer 'play' activity for kids at one time. We had no Snapchat you see. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 18 Jul 2018, 03:08

My mother used to put burning newspapers up the chimney to set fire to the loose soot. She called that sweeling the chimney. So in that case it was more accurately cleansing by fire. Done regularly all you got was a burst of smoke and ash, not a chimney fire.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf » 18 Jul 2018, 05:51

It was also called swaling, just a slight difference in spelling but more on Google!

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 18 Jul 2018, 20:44

Thanks for that. It's one of those words that you speak, but rarely see written down.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 19 Jul 2018, 02:16

I'm sure I've asked this before but why do we say that people get on like a house on fire?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 05 Aug 2018, 05:27

I heard an interesting definition this morning on 'Something Understood' on R4. The lady said that in the Middle Ages when pilgrimage to holy Lands, the Sanct Terre, was a common practice, walkers who let it be known they were pilgrims (whether they were or not!) were said to be 'Sancte Terre ing' and this became corrupted over time into 'sauntering'. I like the etymology so much I haven't looked it up!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 06 Aug 2018, 22:18

Stanley wrote:
05 Aug 2018, 05:27
I like the etymology so much I haven't looked it up!
You did right not to check it out - you must have had the same hunch that I had - fake def.

I have checked, and I think this from Wiktionary covers it - :smile:

"Various fanciful folk etymologies also given.[5][6]"
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 07 Aug 2018, 02:48

I'll stick to the fake one..... I like it! I'm a great believer in 'the ring of truth' David....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 07 Aug 2018, 09:42

There have been letters to The Times because someone wrote that flapdoodle meant the same as `nonsense'. A northerner said that's wrong and it meant `panic'.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 07 Aug 2018, 11:05

Tizer wrote:
07 Aug 2018, 09:42
A northerner said that's wrong and it meant `panic'.
perhaps he thought it had 'the ring of truth' about it. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Aug 2018, 02:55

No, I think that the 'flap' element triggered that one. 'flap' for panic originated in the RAF I think because of the waggling of the wings if someone was not certain what to do in a dangerous situation. Connotations with frightened hens flapping about.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 08 Aug 2018, 07:03

A word i haven't heard for years "swig", take a swig from my bottle of tea ?

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Aug 2018, 07:36

I use it frequently Bodge, mainly for my early morning dose of cod liver oil and always denoting swigged from the neck of the bottle. All my sources note it as 16th century and of unknown origin.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 15 Aug 2018, 10:53

I'm hearing `weaponise' used frequently. The car used to mow down people the other day was `weaponised'. Social media accounts are being weaponised. Bottles of acid have been weaponised.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 16 Aug 2018, 03:05

It conveys the concept clearly and so I don't object to it.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 16 Aug 2018, 09:01

A man on the radio this morning talked about an `up-tick statistic'. Does he mean a rise, I wonder? (I there such a thing as a down-tick?)

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 17 Aug 2018, 02:44

Never heard that one.... Haven't heard 'dead cat bounce' lately either. Another economics based bit of language.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 23 Aug 2018, 09:39

My mystery object has reminded me of 'I'll give you a fourpenny one

Here's a link to the usual range of origins Take your pick. I'm going with the ice cream. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 24 Aug 2018, 03:32

Nice one David. The old pennies were big enough to make a knuckleduster effect if held between the fingers of a clenched fist, but that fails slightly in that only three were needed.
On a different note. 'To buckle down' to a job. In another age when I was doing heavy lifting all day I used to wear a heavy leather belt buckled up tight enough to give your stomach muscles something to bear against when they were under strain. It made a difference at the end of the day. So buckling down makes sense.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 24 Aug 2018, 09:20

Stanley wrote:
24 Aug 2018, 03:32
but that fails slightly in that only three were needed.
I didn't look into that close enough - I judged it to be 'fake news' straight away, and didn't think it through. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 01 Sep 2018, 11:11

Just heard the word 'otherising' used on LBC.

"You are otherising' my curly hair".
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