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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 21 Oct 2018, 11:21
by plaques
What's left of English after Brexit?

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 22 Oct 2018, 02:13
by Stanley
Depends where you are facing.......
Lish..... I found this, somehow I don't think they are into dialect....
"Lish is also a good rescue tool. The console provides out-of-band access to your Linode, which means you can use Lish to access your Linode even when you are unable to connect directly via SSH. This is useful if firewall settings or a bad network configuration prevent you from accessing your Linode using SSH."

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 23 Oct 2018, 12:02
by Tripps
I've never heard of it, but seems to be English and means nimble or lithe.
lish

Now here's a gem from NASA. Intended or not?

": A tabular iceberg can be seen on the right, floating among sea ice just off of the Larsen C ice shelf. The iceberg's sharp angles and flat surface indicate that it probably recently calved from the ice shelf. :smile:

PS - presumably formed by the same process as the rocks at Ilkley?

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 23 Oct 2018, 14:54
by Tizer
Am I missing something? It's normal to describe icebergs as calving from an ice shelf or a glacier and this meaning is in the Collins dictionary. I know in the original usage it would be incorrect to say a baby cow calved from its mother because it's the mother that does the calving. But in the case of icebergs it's usually the berg that's said to calve. :smile:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 23 Oct 2018, 15:01
by Tripps
Tizer wrote: 23 Oct 2018, 14:54 Am I missing something?
Obviously not - it's me that's wrong - I'm not big into icebergs and I've never known that they give birth to little icebergs - I just thought it was a mistake and they had meant carved.
We live and learn :smile:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 24 Oct 2018, 02:40
by Stanley
Acting in my role as resident pedant.... Whilst bergs can break into smaller lumps, the calving is when they leave the ice shelf or glacier.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 24 Oct 2018, 08:57
by Tripps
Here's an alternative take on the Iceberg

:smile:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 24 Oct 2018, 11:40
by plaques
I didn't know it until I looked it up that there is a standard definition for icebergs plus bergy bits and growlers. icebergs

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 25 Oct 2018, 01:51
by Stanley
:good:
Why do clouds 'scud' across the face of the moon? Where did that one come from.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 25 Oct 2018, 10:20
by Tizer
One suggestion is that it's from a Dutch word meaning the same as we use scud. Another that it's from a rabbit's scut (tail).

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 25 Oct 2018, 13:04
by Tripps
Here's more information about the word Scud than any human being needs to know.

Scud

Bet no one knew it meant Irn Bru in Glasgow. :smile:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 25 Oct 2018, 17:10
by plaques
From Tripp's link....Etymology Perhaps from Old Norse skjóta (“to throw, to shoot”).

During the cold war the Russian missile was called the Scud. Scud.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Oct 2018, 01:52
by Stanley
Amazing.......

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Oct 2018, 11:40
by plaques
Amphiboly or Amphibology, If you think some of my posts are misleading please have a word with me.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 27 Oct 2018, 02:10
by Stanley
:good:

Later.... I've just used a word that some might not know. 'Podger bar', a tapered drift used to line holes up. Many would call it a 'drift' but to me that's slightly different. Podger bars are always long enough to act as a lever and not be simply driven in.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 27 Oct 2018, 09:25
by Tizer
Every home should have one.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 27 Oct 2018, 09:35
by Tizer
plaques wrote: 26 Oct 2018, 11:40 Amphiboly or Amphibology, If you think some of my posts are misleading please have a word with me.
The following comes from this American web site: LINK
Amphiboly often leads to humorous misunderstandings and confusions. Newspaper headlines are one common source of amphiboly. Here are a few examples: 'Prostitutes Appeal to Pope' -- 'Farmer Bill Dies in House' -- 'Dr. Ruth to Talk About Sex With Newspaper Editors' -- 'Burglar Gets Nine Months in Violin Case' -- 'Juvenile Court to Try Shooting Defendant' -- 'Red Tape Holds Up New Bridge' -- 'Marijuana Issues Sent to a Joint Committee' -- 'Two Convicts Evade Noose: Jury Hung.'

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Oct 2018, 02:24
by Stanley
"President Lincoln wrote the Gettysburg Address while travelling on the back of an envelope"

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 01 Nov 2018, 12:36
by Tripps
I was a little drowsy, but I swear I heard an American professor use the word 'visibilise' on the wireless early this morning. I made no comment when Uncle Bob used 'memorialise' recently, but I think that's a probably step too far. Of course the spell checker says I should use a z (that'll be zee rather than zed), instead of an s, but I refuse. :smile:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 01 Nov 2018, 13:28
by Stanley
Same here David.....

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 02 Nov 2018, 08:12
by Cathy
Heard the saying 'milling about', to me it means standing around, seemingly doing not much.
Can only find - 'Grist to the mill', grinding oats etc.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 02 Nov 2018, 08:37
by Stanley
That's a good one Cathy, we use words without thought. I shall have a furtle...
I fond this Cathy.... ""to keep moving round and round in a mass," 1874 (implied in milling), originally of cattle, from mill (n.1) on resemblance to the action of a mill wheel. Related: Milled." So you are right, it's because of the movement of grain when it is milled. I always associate it most with purposeless movement rather than organised activity.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 02 Nov 2018, 11:32
by Tripps
Here's what the word means to me. Mercifully I only did it once - and to my amazement - I won. My opponent was even less inclined to participate than I was. :smile:

Milling

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 02 Nov 2018, 16:15
by Tizer
Good grief, do we really still allow that sort of thing to go on in our military training? It belongs in medieval times, not the 21st Century, even if they are provided with head-guards, gumshields and 18oz boxing gloves.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 03 Nov 2018, 04:23
by Stanley
I agree, it's a medieval mind set and I note that women will be paired with men. I am appalled, if this is the attitude in training young people is it any wonder that things like the tragedies at Deepcut occur?
The only time anything vaguely approaching this level of violence happened to me was in my first year at a very old-fashioned grammar school that acted on 'public school' lines. It was deeply shocking to me to be forced to be violent towards another human being and I have never forgotten it. In later years on the tramp and in the army I mixed with a wide variety of characters, some of them quite frightening but I never encountered anything like Milling!
Funny thing is that despite the lack of this 'flagship moment in training' I came out of National Service as a full corporal (vanishingly rare) and was accounted a 'good soldier'.