DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

User avatar
Whyperion
Senior Member
Posts: 2176
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 22:13
Location: Stockport, after some time in Burnley , After leaving Barnoldswick , except when I am in London

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 02 Jun 2020, 08:16

Watching Canterbury Cathedral on BBC2 this morning

Slype

slype is a variant of slip in the sense of a narrow passage; in architecture, the name for the covered passage usually found in monasteries or cathedrals between the transept and the chapter house.


I think Slip for ginnel and alleyway I have heard of, possibly when I was in Otley

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 13198
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 02 Jun 2020, 08:28

Reading a book about rock formations in Namibia where wind-driven sand has eroded them into curious shapes I was puzzled by what I took to be a mis-spelling repeated several times. It kept referring to corrasion of the rock, instead of corrosion. I looked up corrasion in Collins and found no entry, and my spellchecker in this post is also flagging it as wrong. Eventually I found it in a geology dictionary. Corrasion is distinct from corrosion which applies only to chemical attack on a material. Corrasion is also destructive but due to physical attack. In geology it covers both abrasion (by friction, rubbing, e.g. by water and wind) and attrition (by physical impact such as pebbles on the beach or rocks in a stream).

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 03 Jun 2020, 02:21

Nice Tiz. Another useful word for me and David.

Image

Brimham Rocks near Pately Bridge.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
plaques
Donor
Posts: 4796
Joined: 23 May 2013, 22:09

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques » 03 Jun 2020, 08:14

Keir Starmer accusing Boris of 'winging' it.

Wing it: Improvise, as in The interviewer had not read the author's book; he was just winging it. This expression comes from the theater, where it alludes to an actor studying his part in the wings (the areas to either side of the stage) because he has been suddenly called on to replace another

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 13198
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 03 Jun 2020, 09:12

This giant boulder in the Namibian desert hasn't rolled into this position or been dropped by an ancient glacier. It's what was left after the wind, sandstorms and freeze-thaw have eroded the original rocks differentially.

Image

User avatar
Cathy
Senior Member
Posts: 3250
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 02:24

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 03 Jun 2020, 09:21

Isn’t Mother Nature wonderful.
You’d have to be dead unlucky to be in the wrong place at the wrong time... :laugh5:
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 04 Jun 2020, 02:50

I always have the same thought about balancing stones Cathy!
In old fashioned byres, shippons and mistals solid waste was shovelled out into the midden and in the best set ups the liquids drained into an underground tank where it was stored and later tanked out onto grass with a horse drwan wooden box cart. The tank was always called the 'saur' tank round here. I always thought that was a dialect version of sour but wonder whether it's even older and related to the German 'sauer'?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 05 Jun 2020, 04:58

'Rive'. To tear or split, such a useful word. I looked it up.
"From Middle English riven (“to rive”), of North Germanic origin, from Old Norse rífa (“to rend, tear apart”), from Proto-Germanic *rīfaną (“to tear, scratch”), from Proto-Indo-European *(e)reip- (“to crumble, tear”). Cognate with Danish rive (“to tear”), Old Frisian rīva (“to tear”), Old English ārǣfan (“to let loose, unwrap”), Old Norse ript (“breach of contract, rift”), Norwegian Bokmål rive (“to tear”) and Albanian rrip (“belt, rope”)."
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Julie in Norfolk
Regular User
Posts: 394
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 16:28
Location: Norfolk, England
Contact:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Julie in Norfolk » 06 Jun 2020, 13:13

Ancestors of mine were slate rivers in the lake district, splitting slate into thinner sheet / tiles etc. You try looking that up in the internet and you get lovely pictures of some place called Slate River. Ah well....
Measure with a micrometer, mark with a pencil, cut with an axe.

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 07 Jun 2020, 03:12

Julie, Good morning! A very good example of 'Riven', in fact perfect.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Jun 2020, 04:07

In a spare moment I dipped into my new Bolton Priory book and tripped over something that grabbed me. I have always liked working out the origins of family names and many of them were connected with occupations. Here are a few that spring to mind.
Geldard = keeper of the gelded cattle, Bullocks. 'Geldherd'.
Coward = Cowherd
Goddard = Goatherd
Nutter = Neatherd. (Keepers of deer in Royal Forests)
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 13198
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 10 Jun 2020, 09:29

`Surnames: Word of Mouth' Radio 4 LINK
`What's in a name? Chris Ledgard looks at where our surnames come from and what they mean to us. He meets two people with very unusual stories, then visits the team of researchers at UWE who are tracing the origins of family names in the UK - many for the first time. And Gregory Clark is using surnames to track the wealth and status of families over forty generations, with surprising results.'

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 11 Jun 2020, 02:34

The origin and advent of the use of surnames (and place and field names) is a very interesting historical field. I have always had a peripheral fascination with them. My forename Stanley is actually more common as a surname and derives from Stoneleigh in Warwickshire and that in turn derives from 'stony place'.....
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Bodger
Senior Member
Posts: 1217
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:30
Location: Ireland

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 11 Jun 2020, 11:08

Just reading a comment about a photo from a relation who lives in the Penistone area, That was February and as a mother I was whittled sick knowing how bad it would be going up Snowden

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 12 Jun 2020, 03:20

Never come across that usage Bodge, must be local I think.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tripps
Senior Member
Posts: 4409
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 14:56

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 20 Jun 2020, 19:11

'having me on'

Now used as a greeting by callers to talk show radio hosts - 'thanks for having me on'

It once meant not telling me the truth - now superseded by 'you're joking' or 'you're kidding me'

I'd get out more if I could. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 21 Jun 2020, 02:53

Don't bother David, stay in and keep making intelligent posts!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Cathy
Senior Member
Posts: 3250
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 02:24

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 21 Jun 2020, 05:58

I also have noticed a lot of ‘thanks for having me on’ being said on our tv chat shows. Mostly the people and the subject wouldn’t in normal times be on the show, but because of late we have had less news to report the show needs fillers to keep the show going. Quite a few of the subjects are about things to do while most of us are stuck at home.
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

User avatar
PanBiker
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
Posts: 10682
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 13:07
Location: Barnoldswick - In the West Riding of Yorkshire, always was, always will be.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by PanBiker » 21 Jun 2020, 08:51

For show fillers, we play a game at home of spot the recognisable "celebrity"! Lots of the "Celebrity" versions of shows have folk on that I haven't a clue who they are, probably had a bit part in a soap or a day in the jungle, another favourite are the old Big Brother dummies. What's wrong with having normal folk, they are usually a hell of lot more interesting.
Ian

User avatar
Tripps
Senior Member
Posts: 4409
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 14:56

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 21 Jun 2020, 10:39

My favourite nonentity celebrity is Gemma Collins. Her ingenuity at getting herself into the Daily Mail news list is wonderful. She links herself to whatever is in the news, and regularly loses several stones in weight in just a couple of weeks. An example to us all. Tragic about her beloved cat - a ventilated victim of corona virus - we can all relate to that - and it was only 25 years old, no age at all.

PS - further intensive research cat age chartreveals that in human years, the cat was the equivalent of 116 years old. It's a cruel world. :smile:
Born to be mild. . .

User avatar
PanBiker
Site Administrator
Site Administrator
Posts: 10682
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 13:07
Location: Barnoldswick - In the West Riding of Yorkshire, always was, always will be.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by PanBiker » 21 Jun 2020, 11:00

I bet Gemma doesn't make it to 116.
Ian

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 13198
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 21 Jun 2020, 15:45

She probably won't get a pension until she's 99! :sad:

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 22 Jun 2020, 03:03

I tripped over the name Wayte in the Bolton Priory book. Realised it was the same as Waite my old mate Ted.
Look it up, interesting, wayte and its variants were originally watchmen, then become community singers 'waits'.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 59360
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 23 Jun 2020, 03:39

Another name from the past. 'Lambhyird', this was the senior shepherd on a monastic estate. Origin of Lambert surname perhaps?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Bodger
Senior Member
Posts: 1217
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:30
Location: Ireland

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 23 Jun 2020, 05:53

A word that caused amusement here in Ireland we were talking about lighting fires, i said i always started by "riddling" it ?

Post Reply

Return to “General Miscellaneous Chat & Gossip”