DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Tripps
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

Well done with that -I shall return to the subject.

Had a bit of fun today when Oldham Community radio responded to the email I sent to Ian Wolstenholme the presenter yesterday. I recorded the piece he did on the show today, and I've thanked him for it. It seemed to chime with him - I didn't expect him to read the whole thing out. :smile:

Hear it here if you wish.
Scroll down to the bottom and press 'play'.


PS - Thinking about it I guess Gloria must take some of the blame for this nonsense, since she originally put me in touch with the chap I bought the books from. :smile:
Last edited by Tripps on 18 Sep 2020, 19:17, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques »

Sorry Tripps I tried your link but just went round in circles until I gave up.
Phenomenology springs to mind.

Phenomenology is the study of structures of consciousness as experienced from the first-person point of view. The central structure of an experience is its intentionality, its being directed toward something, as it is an experience of or about some object.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

Sorry about that. I've changed the link - can you try it now? If that doesn't work, I surrender. :smile:

PS Or try this another link I've learned a lot today -I think. . . .
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by plaques »

Excellent Tripps. Nice to sit back and listen to something sensible for a change. :good:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

The link worked for me. What a good quote.... Nice that it got air time!
( LINK to Merriam Webster definition of Gallithump.)
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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History and Etymology for callithump
back-formation from callithumpian, adjective, alteration of English dialect Gallithumpian disturber of order at elections in 18th century


Thanks for that - it's definitely on my list of favourite words along with tergiversate, persiflagilistically and kuripot. :laugh5:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

Lovely. We need more Gallithumpians and lerts!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer »

Elsewhere I've posted a link to a BBC article in which the correspondent has the phrase: `In fact, the firm has effectively become the boogeyman of surveillance tech'. Is a boogeyman something different to a bogeyman?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

I think it's an American usage Peter. I found THIS interesting article in Wiki on 'bogeyman'. I like the theory that it comes from German.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Later I learned that the Boogaloo is a the name of a far right organisation in the US that is on the rise. And they call themselves 'Boogeymen'.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Today's word is 'Appassimento'.

Process in wine making whereby the grapes are left out in the sun to dry off before processing. Said to concentrate the sugars and flavours.

It's OK - and powerful 14% ABV. I'll see off the other half tonight and finally make my mind up. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I never got beyond 'Noble Rot'.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

'Codger'. Webster says 'an often mildly eccentric and usually elderly fellow '. That sounds about right. :biggrin2:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer »

Why do we refer to lodgings, boarding houses etc as `digs'?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley wrote: 09 Oct 2020, 03:04 Webster says 'an often mildly eccentric and usually elderly fellow
I'll settle for that. :smile:

Just had an Indian chap on the phone from HMRC - said there had been mischief and he might have to send the Police round. He asked me for my National Insurance number. I carefully said Alpha Bravo one two three. . .He then interrupted and said four five six - Correct said I. He then said I was a jaunty fellow, and hung up on me before I could say 'no - jaunty old codger'. :laugh5:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

Peter, I've seen it in old books called 'diggings'. I went for a furtle. Here's what I found.
"In British usage, to be in digs is to live in a room in a house with shared facilities, frequently with meals supplied by the landlady. It’s typically a lodging for students or young unmarried men and women.
It’s short for diggings, which is the older word for the same idea. That derives — as you might guess — from a place where one digs, a word that goes back to the sixteenth century. Many books argue that the original diggings linked to the accommodation sense were the gold fields of California and Australia. We do know that the Australian nickname digger comes from this area of life and so it’s sometimes assumed that the word is likewise Australian, though all the early evidence is American and the term predates both these gold rushes anyway. But there is a gold fields connection."

"....it’s in Jerome K Jerome’s Three Men in a Boat of 1889: “We were tired and hungry, we same three, and when we got to Datchet we took out the hamper, the two bags, and the rugs and coats, and such like things, and started off to look for diggings.”
The abbreviation digs came along at about that time; most definitely that’s a British invention. Because it turns up first in an issue of The Stage in 1893, it is thought to have been created by actors (who, frequently being itinerant, had more need of them than most people), though later examples suggest that if it was originally theatrical slang it quickly moved out into the population at large.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Later... Listening to Claire Balding I learned a new word. I have always known that 'Totters' was a colloquial term for rag and bone men and is still used in the South by modern dustmen. 'Tot' was a medieval word for bone and that's the origin for the term still used today.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Thanks for digs information Stanley - fascinating!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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:good:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I have been rabbiting on about packed lunches this morning and the various name I have heard for it came to mind, 'bait', 'snap' and 'bagging'. I think bait was the local name in Barlick. Bagging was in Warwickshire and snap was in the mining communities of the North East.
Anyone got other examples?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf »

We are watching Saving Lives at Sea about the RNLI and an Irish fishing boat skipper just casually used the word 'parlous' to describe the situation of his boat when it lost steering. Ashamed to say that I had to look it up.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

I'm surprised at that. I usually associate it with 'a parlous state'. Like many words it's good to think about them and do a bit of 'looking up'. It seems it derives from perilous which would make sense. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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We all have odd blanks in our lexicon Wendy. They can come in surprising forms. For years I pronounced ' misled' wrong in my head when I was reading. I pronounced it as if it was like 'miserly'.
That brings to mind the lad who asked his mother why men were gaoled for laughing. He was reading manslaughter as man's laughter. Perfectly understandable!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

It's getting late. . .

I've been pondering the word of the moment 'bubble '

I intended to mention it's meaning from the army in the 1960's when it meant something like the more modern 'grass'. 'Put the bubble in ' meant to report a misdemeanour to a superior. I'm probably one of the few who can remember that, and be bothered to mention it. I can find no reference to it so you'll just have to trust me. :smile:

The obvious one is what West Ham supporters are always singing about and are 'forever blowing.'

There's more - The last person to leave a knockout poker tournament without any prize money is said to be outside the 'bubble'.

It's cockney rhyming slang for Greek .. Bubble and squeak.

A period of intense speculation - The South Sea bubble. The property bubble. Dot com bubble.

And I guess there are more. Interesting - words aren't they? :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion »

The Grassing up one I have not heard before.

It , along with present usage, is making the noun into a verb, which is interesting.
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