DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

Cathy wrote: 11 Dec 2020, 05:35 Paraprosdokian.

Is it on your list Tripps?
It is now. . . thanks Cathy for improving my day. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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At a concert, a woman says, "I do love good music!" Her companion, Groucho Marx, says "So do I. Let's get outta here!".
Does this qualify?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I encountered `emersion' for the first time yesterday. The dictionary defines it as the act of emerging. It was in a magazine article about archaeologists preserving old wood objects by putting them in a solution of polyethylene glycol. Emersion had obviously been used mistakenly and it should have been immersion.

NB. It was an interesting article. Old wood ships like the Mary Rose have been treated with the glycol routinely but some of the wood is now disintegrating because sulphur in the wood slowly changes to sulphuric acid. They are now preventing this by soaking the wood with a liquid containing alkaline nanoparticles that neutralise the acid as it's formed.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Pronunciation changes. Have you noticed the emphasis in pastoral moving from the first syllable to the second? 'Pastoral' I heard another instance this morning of a word with 'oral' in it being modified but have forgotten which it was!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I've now seen the word bloc in sentences such as `Putting a bloc on imports'. One of them was in the Guardian so that one wasn't too surprising!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf »

I've just learnt a very useful word courtesy of Susie Dent in the Radio Times. It's 4.30pm so it must be quafftide! Cheers.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Wendy. We always used to say the blokes waiting outside the pub, early hours, were waiting for the tide to come in.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I came across this in the Spectator. Never heard of it, but I see there was one at Skipton.
I think I could quite easily cope with the life now after nearly a year's practice. I'd have to have broadband in my cell though. :laugh5:

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I'm surprised they have escaped your attention David, but of course I will be in the same position with things familiar to you. That's the lovely thing about some of our topics like this one, we get exposed to new things and learn.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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A word used around the Holmfirth area 1940s for sandwich " phonetic" Shauf, Shawve. ie. a jam shawve
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I can't remember where Tony but I have come across that. I think it's closely related to skive and shave, both associated with thin slices.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Yet another example of an innocent word or phrase being hijacked by a group to suit their own claims...
BBC journalist Laura Kuennsberg has been attacked on social media and reported to the BBC directors for using the phrase `nitty-gritty' in one of her political news articles. The `woke' warriors claim that the phrase refers to `the detritus left in the bottom of slave ships'. Linguists and etymologists are puzzled and say they've never heard of such a derivation and the phrase didn't appear until the 1930s anyway. Fortunately the new BBC boss is taking a different approach to his predecessor and has refused to take any action against Ms Kuennsberg, saying he won't give in to these attacks on our language.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Never heard anything as ridiculous as that in my life! Pure twisted imagination. Totally wrong as well, any detritus in the bilges of slave ships would not be nitty or gritty!
Funnily enough the word that came to my mind yesterday was also connected. In a shippon, the channel behind the bosses where the dung and urine fell was always known round here as the 'group'. I can find no mention of it in any of the normal locations.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Have we spoken about COON Cheeses having to change the name to CHEER Cheeses, after racism concerns?
The name COON came from the cheese’s creator , an American called Dr. Edward William Coon.
CHEER Cheese will be available July ‘21.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Never come across that Cathy. Perhaps it should have been named 'Dr. Coon's' cheese.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I heard someone on the radio the other day who obviously should have used the word `ingenuous' but he pronounced it `ingenius'! :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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People today don't spend enough time listening or reading. They are constantly distracted by screens and a visual culture. Being quiet with a good book and inhabiting your own imagination is largely a lost art. They don't know what they are missing......
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Just heard the Home Secretary use the word 'operationalise', and last night the President of the National Students' Union said 'invisibilisation'.

I'd get out more - if I could. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Rishi has spent too much time with American hedge fund wallahs, that's where he got furlough from.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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From Dutch `verlof', for leave.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley wrote: 28 Jan 2021, 03:05 Rishi has spent too much time with American hedge fund wallahs,
Quite possibly - but Priti Patel is the Home Secretary. :smile:

Good to see wallah used. Thinks of 'dhobi wallah' - though the one I used was Chinese. :smile:
Tizer wrote: 28 Jan 2021, 11:40 From Dutch `verlof', for leave.
There's an Anglo Saxon word as well, for leave which ends in 'of' and is not dissimilar. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Sorry about that! I'm getting old David, I get my Priti and Rishi mixed up!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Same here Bodge. I do wonder about some of them though. That first one doesn't look kosher to me.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Number 8 gave me one of those 'I'd forgotten that I'd forgotten that' moments.

Ackle - working as it should do. For some unknown reason it took my mind back over 50 years to a workshop in North Germany.

Example - 'the local oscillator isn't ackling'.

Never thought it was a Yorkshire word. Google says little - but no mention of Yorkshire.

- Ackle - WORK as in this electric kettle does not ackle any more. Common use in middle England.

PS I first looked with my ad blocker off, and it was so full of ads that it was almost unreadable. :smile:
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