DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Callunna

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Callunna » 07 Feb 2012, 13:35

That reminds me - did we ever establish who/what Bob Preston was/is in relation to Bob Preston Hill in Barlick? You’d think it was a name but perhaps it’s a corruption of something else (the ancient craft of presting bobbs, perhaps?).

User avatar
catgate
Regular User
Posts: 175
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 11:23
Location: Just over in that corner -->
Contact:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by catgate » 07 Feb 2012, 14:58

Tizer wrote:There was a farmer's field behind the house were I spent my childhood and everyone called it `Johnny's Meadow' but I don't recall John being the name of the farmer. I wonder if it had some other meaning or was just used to denote any field close to home?
Perhaps it was due to what was sometimes found there. :confused:

User avatar
Whyperion
Senior Member
Posts: 1991
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 22:13
Location: Stockport, after some time in Burnley , After leaving Barnoldswick , except when I am in London

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 07 Feb 2012, 15:56

Twerp , possibly more refined version of Berk ? (look it up as not for polite company ).
Or derived from insult of Turnip Head ? Go and get us a bottle of turps for thinning the paint.

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Feb 2012, 05:46

From memory 'twerp' was an immature goldfish.
Field names: At Marton there was a Harry's Field near Gledstone. Who knows who Harry was, these names entered common usage and stuck, just as fascinating a field as place names. Seek out 'The Living Fields' by Harlan. Published by Cambridge it gives a lot of interesting info about the origin of field names.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Feb 2012, 06:02

Just used 'having the wool pulled over your eyes'. Now where did that come from?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Cathy
Senior Member
Posts: 3199
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 02:24

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 08 Feb 2012, 08:51

Don't know who to thank for this one, details not given.
We've all heard the expression "It was so quiet you could hear a pin drop". One explanation of the origin of this saying relates to candle auctions. In candle auctions in England in the early 1800s a pin would be stuck into the side of a specially-made tallow candle about an inch above its base and the bidding would go on while the candle burned. The winning bid was the last one made before the pin dropped out of the melting wax. It is said that the crowd would fall completely silent at that important moment when the pin was about to drop.
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 08 Feb 2012, 09:29

I have heard that as well Cath.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Marilyn
VIP Member
Posts: 6221
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 20:29
Location: South Australia

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Marilyn » 08 Feb 2012, 09:49

Could "pulling the wool over someone" refer to biblical times.
Was it Cain ( who killed his brother Abel) that skinned an animal and wore it so his blind father would think he was touching his favourite son? Abel had been more hirsute than Cain, hence the animal skin.
( gosh...going back to Sunday School days with THAT one...)

User avatar
Belle
Regular User
Posts: 124
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 17:10

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Belle » 08 Feb 2012, 10:35

Sounds plausible Cathy, and Maz.

User avatar
catgate
Regular User
Posts: 175
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 11:23
Location: Just over in that corner -->
Contact:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by catgate » 08 Feb 2012, 10:43

Stanley wrote:Just used 'having the wool pulled over your eyes'. Now where did that come from?
From believing "twerp" was an immature goldfish. Much of the literature says "pregnant" goldfish.....and thereupon lies the twist.

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 09 Feb 2012, 06:36

I was close Catty...
Maz, I like that theory, sounds plausible to me.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 12958
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 09 Feb 2012, 12:36

Every time I hear the name Redknapp and football I think "What a palava". Is palava one of those words adopted from India during the time of the Empire and Raj? Or is it from Italian. Or is it a place in Finalnd?

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 10 Feb 2012, 06:43

Tiz, nothing in Webster but I found this on the net: "It's normally spelt "palaver". According to the Oxford English Dictionary it derives from the Portuguese "palavra" meaning "speech" (cognate with the English word "parable")which meant "talk, parley,discussion", specifically between Portuguese traders and West African natives. So "what a palaver" - "what a load of [pointless] discussion".
I asked Ian this morning if his ears were burning because Doc and I were talking about him on Wednesday. Common usage? Origin?
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

Bruff
Avid User
Posts: 841
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 08:42
Location: Hoylake, Wirral - for the moment

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bruff » 10 Feb 2012, 09:11

Noticed right at the beginning of this thread reference to 'bread rolls' and the different terms for them depending where you are in the country.

I posted a thread years ago called I think 'Of barm cakes, bread rolls and baps', where it was discussed. Just to recap, what got me posting was Barlickers calling a bread roll a 'tea cake', and a bread roll with currents in it a 'current tea cake'. In Sheffield where I lioved for many years, a 'tea cake' is what a Barlicker would call a 'current tea cake', with the Barlicker's 'tea cake' known as a 'bread cake'. But in Barnsley, a few miles up the road from Sheffield, they refer to tea cakes and current tea cakes in exactly the same way as folk from Barlick.

Here on Merseyside, we have the 'nudger'. This is a large 'finger roll'. So you can get your 'sausage nudger' from the caff. I tend to come over all 'Sid James' when I order a nudger. There's also a large flat tea cake called a 'bin lid'.

It's also worth noting that a sandwich is not always something between two slices of 'bread'. When I was living in Leicester, I saw some appetising 'sandwiches' behind the bar and so asked what 'sandwiches' they had. The barman said they didn't have any. Rather aghast, I asked what on earth they were behind him? He said, 'Oh, we have cobs'.

Richard Broughton

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 12958
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 10 Feb 2012, 09:51

When I was a student in Liverpool I was warned about the meaning of nudger so that I wouldn't get into trouble! Later, working for Rank Hovis McDougall, I learnt how variable the composition and form of bread products was throughout the UK, let alone globally. When the labs developed new products they had to be tailored to the location.

I note Bruff saying "..they refer to tea cakes and current tea cakes.." and I can't resist asking, "In that case, what do they call expired tea cakes?" [Sorry!] :laugh5:

Talking of bread...As the populations of the Eastern world become more affluent the demand for rice is falling but for wheat is rising. Bread is replacing rice in the staple diet. Meat consumption is increasing and this means that more grain is being used to `make' cows, a much less efficient food source than grain itself. So wheat prices will rise due to both human and animal consumption demands.

User avatar
Tripps
Senior Member
Posts: 4300
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 14:56

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 10 Feb 2012, 10:42

Palaver - "what a load of [pointless] discussion".
I think it comes from the same root as "Parliament"
Born to be mild. . .

User avatar
catgate
Regular User
Posts: 175
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 11:23
Location: Just over in that corner -->
Contact:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by catgate » 10 Feb 2012, 18:41

tripps wrote:Palaver - "what a load of [pointless] discussion".
I think it comes from the same root as "Parliament"
Isn't it some sort of Welsh seaweed?

User avatar
Bodger
Senior Member
Posts: 1208
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:30
Location: Ireland

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bodger » 11 Feb 2012, 00:04

Bruff in Sheffield did you ever eat a pikelet ?, its like a crumpet but not as thick

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 11 Feb 2012, 04:50

Bodge, never understood pikelets. Bruff, if you're walling a nudger is a big stone.
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

User avatar
Cathy
Senior Member
Posts: 3199
Joined: 24 Jan 2012, 02:24

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy » 11 Feb 2012, 09:57

We know pikelets as flapjacks ??
I know I'm in my own little world, but it's OK... they know me here. :)

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 12958
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 11 Feb 2012, 10:36

Do folk still use `any road' as an alternative for `anyway', `whatever' (woteva in modern teenage argot). Example: You and a friend are trying to agree a time to meet, and you say "Any road, I'll see you this evening".

User avatar
Whyperion
Senior Member
Posts: 1991
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 22:13
Location: Stockport, after some time in Burnley , After leaving Barnoldswick , except when I am in London

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Whyperion » 11 Feb 2012, 16:29

Wife and her friends from South Yorkshire does , I sometimes understand her , not always though.

Callunna

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Callunna » 11 Feb 2012, 16:41

Oh aye! Definitely!
Sometimes I’ll say “Any road up” if I’m feeling verbose.

User avatar
Tizer
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 12958
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 19:46
Location: Somerset, UK

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 11 Feb 2012, 16:46

I'm glad to hear that, I can hear it said in my head, the same as everybody used to say it when I was a nipper!

User avatar
Stanley
Global Moderator
Global Moderator
Posts: 58471
Joined: 23 Jan 2012, 12:01
Location: Barnoldswick. Nearer to Heaven than Gloria.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 12 Feb 2012, 04:54

I still use it. Mind you, I am a refuge for archaic phrases!
Stanley Challenger Graham
Stanley's View
scg1936 at talktalk.net

"Beware of certitude" (Jimmy Reid)
The floggings will continue until morale improves!

Post Reply

Return to “General Miscellaneous Chat & Gossip”