DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Belle
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Belle » 12 Feb 2012, 08:40

Pikelets here are like crumpets in that they have holes and a vertical structure running through them, but they are spread out like pancakes, so thinnner and "flappier". My dad always called dropped scones (that's the scottish term for them) flapjacks..but most people use the term flapjacks when refering to very solid oat structures that don't flap at all.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Julie in Norfolk » 13 Feb 2012, 03:05

I am with you for the pikelets and used to make them when younger, I have a Theodora Fitzgibbon book with a recipe. I had quite forgotton that I used to say anyroad, but having to live amongst folk from East Anglia, I got fed up of explaining the context, anyroad.....
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 13 Feb 2012, 06:05

You were up an hour before me Jules...
I used a term yesterday and wondered whether it was local or more widespread. If we had a beast that was off colour indoors at the end of the winter we often said that "Doctor Green would cure her". Meaning of course that getting outside to grass after the winter would buck her up. Anyone else heard it?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bruff » 13 Feb 2012, 08:19

Tiz - yes 'current'; don't know what I was thinking about there!!

The first time I came across a pikelet was in Sheffield, but they are widely available. At the risk of giving away too much information, the 'term of endearment' I use for my wife is 'pikelet'. Which caused a certain consternation with my brother-in-law who thought I was using the derogatory term for a gypsy. I have to say I prefer a crumpet to a pikelet, as I prefer an Eccles Cake to a Chorley Cake. This is a dialect thread so I don't to unnecessarily continue with the 'food' theme, but does the Nelson Cake have any link to Nelson, Lancs?

On phrases etc, one way as kids we used to be kept quiet now and again on a car trip to somewhere, was the promise of 'Corporation Pop' or 'Adam's Ale' on arrival; and on return we would be promised time at 'Blanket Fair'.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 13 Feb 2012, 08:24

Richard, many years since I heard 'Corporation Pop'. Ever come across 'Flag Hash', used when someone had no food and was trailing round looking for what they could pick up cheap or free.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by busybees » 13 Feb 2012, 23:05

Crumpets are cooked in a ring, Pikelets mixture is just ladelled onto the hotplate and is therefore thinner. A milkcake is a very large pikelet. I used to help make and pack crumpets at Stanleys crumpets as a kid.
I use the word lopid alot , it means really dirty and in need of a good clean. My chap laughs at me because he has never heard of it. Have you?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Callunna » 13 Feb 2012, 23:45

'Twas a sad day indeed - and a severe blow to human civilisation - when Betty hung up her pinny for the last time at Stanley's Crumpets. Did you work there long, Helen? Can you divulge the secret recipe? I promise it won't go any further than this website, honest...

Never heard of lopid, but it sounds like a very useful word.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 14 Feb 2012, 05:18

Helen, never heard of lopid.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by busybees » 14 Feb 2012, 10:16

Calluna , I have posted how to make pikelets in the cooking section of the hobbies with pictures so you can have a go.
I hope you will, they are easy.
It was a sad day when betty hung up her apron , but I am fortunate to live next door to her so I will try and gleen a bit more out of her, I would like to make her oatcakes because they were just the best dried with stew.

I use the word lopid particularly when I have been doing a really dusty dirty job and it all gets in your hair etc. I usually come out with , ' I am off for a shower because I feel lopid.' but I also use it when something is really really dirty, ' gosh that oven needs cleaning it's lopid'

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Callunna » 14 Feb 2012, 16:51

I have tried on many an occasion to get Betty drunk so that she’ll spill the beans but it never works. Actually I’m fibbing. As Barry & Betty both know, I’m not noted for being overgenerous when it comes to buying a round...

Please give them a big hug from me next time you see them. They probably won’t associate me with Callunna, so just say it’s from Heather & Elaine :heart:

I’m off now to check out that pikelet recipe.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps » 14 Feb 2012, 22:35

Never heard of Lopid - but it also seems to be an anti cholesterol drug. Nearest I've heard was in the army when 'goppin' seemed to have the same meaning. It's odd how certain words which you haven't heard for a long time remind you of certain people. Makes me think of Scots and Geordies. It's in the urban dictionary as 'something which disgusts you'.

Perhaps your word is a made up one - known only to your family. We have 'pumbling' which means (to us at least) wandering about at a slow pace and in an aimless manner.
Born to be mild. . .

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 15 Feb 2012, 06:05

David, I used to call weighing scales 'nebbins'. I still think it's a good word!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bruff » 15 Feb 2012, 08:51

'Lopid' may be a version of the Sheffield term 'loppy', which means essentially the same thing. Sheffielders will refer to a house as 'it wer reet loppy'

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by catgate » 15 Feb 2012, 13:57

A "Lop" or maybe "Lopp" refers to a flea in the higher dales.
I like the expresion "As lish as a lop" which I have heard used in North Ribblesdale and which means "As fit (agile) as a flea" The use of the word "gay" which in the same locality means "very" results in another little gem that is heard in those part ..."Thou's gay lish this mornin."

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 16 Feb 2012, 05:40

Thank you Catty for putting me out of my misery. 'Lish' came to mind the other day and then slipped from memory and I've been trying to remember it. Very common in Barlick especially amongst the older end.
Two things came to mind this morning. Is 'witter' as in nattering or vapid conversation a local thing or more widespread? In farming we used to describe a beast that had survived till Spring as having 'wintered'. Is that a common usage?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bradders Bluesinger » 16 Feb 2012, 10:50

I think Witter is farely widespread ...My ex Mother-in-law (from Blythe Northumberland ) used it ...

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer » 16 Feb 2012, 16:55

Use of `Wintered' is common among birders as in `wintered in Russia then returned to the UK'. Is that what you mean S or do you specifically mean `survived' rather than simply passed winter? (We're getting pedantic here.)

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by catgate » 16 Feb 2012, 17:10

Back in the upper Rbblesdale district one could hear, "Well thou lewks to 'a' wintered gay weal, then?"

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 17 Feb 2012, 06:56

Tiz, Catty has got it, survived the winter.
God knows why but old Sid Demain has popped into my head! Advising a young man on the choice of a wife I heard him say "What tha wants is a gurt thick-legged heifer!" That prompts another thought. "legs like a Mullingar heifer". They were famous for being sturdy cattle.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Belle » 17 Feb 2012, 10:15

Catgate..guy weel is used in south west Scotland..there a very many similarities between old north of England dialect and the broad lowland Scots used by Burns and still used in that area today.
Stanley...if only today's women's magazines had the same philosophy there would be fewer young girls starving themselves!

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Bradders Bluesinger » 17 Feb 2012, 11:14

I refer you to the lyrics of Leadbelly's "Keep Your Hands Off Her" (She Don't Belong to You).....
There's a verse I cannot sing in public...
"She's a Heavy Hipped woman.....Got Great big legs"..Rpt.
"Walkin' like she walkin' on sof' boiled eggs"
.....
.....
It's meant as a compliment , as is ....
"She's a Heavy Hipped woman....She built up straight"..Rpt.
"She got just what it takes "
....
....
I do risk the latter , but often get some "Funny looks " before the verse resolves !
If I can find a link I'll put it on "RAMBLINGS"

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Belle » 17 Feb 2012, 15:42

I am reminded of AC/Dc's whole lot of Rosie! Great song.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 18 Feb 2012, 06:28

Belle one of the reasons why I have always liked the descriptor 'Bonny' is that in my mind it allows you to express appreciation for a well-built woman without any negative connotations. Problem is that I suspect some people see the word as a euphemism for fat these days and don't appreciate it. Tough! Funny thing is that's bonny baby' seems to be OK.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by busybees » 20 Feb 2012, 22:50

I am wittering at the moment about the house move. I use witter to mean nattering and also when you are worried about something, when you are wittered about something.

My Fella was putting a fence up at the allotment the other day and he said , 'That fence post is as reight as rain , it aint going nowhere'

'Reight as rain ' I wonder where that one came from.

Does anyone ever use the word wick? I'm wick ... I use it if I am itchy and uncomfortable . Example a cat could be wick with fleas.
I have heard it used in a different context by a local farmer he said,
'Atta wick?' He used it when he finally got through to a real live person on the phone after selecting from various menus and pushing his buttons for what seemed like an eternity. I can just imagine the person in the call centre in India trying to work out what that one meant haha.

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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley » 21 Feb 2012, 05:31

BB, very common round Barlick and a useful word, covers so many bases.
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