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DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 23 Jan 2012, 14:34
by Stanley
Just used the word 'scudding' in a post and realised we need to get this popular topic on the road again.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 25 Jan 2012, 06:29
by Stanley
Doc is agait and thronged. He's getting t'band in't nick again.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Jan 2012, 07:20
by Stanley
Pluggy ran into Heather in town square. Is this universal, same as 'bumped into'?

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Jan 2012, 09:57
by Bodger
What about "thrutching" as in trying to have a movement when constipated ?, just thought i'd get to the bottom of things

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Jan 2012, 10:09
by Tizer
That's Bodger, getting down to the fundament-als again!

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 26 Jan 2012, 14:42
by Stanley
Or a big effort when trying to push or move something. Not mentioned in Webster or Collins but it definitely exists.
Found this on web: thrutch/θrʌtʃ/
▶noun N. English a narrow gorge or ravine. ▶verb chiefly Climbing push, press, or squeeze into a space.
– origin OE, of W. Gmc origin.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 27 Jan 2012, 05:48
by Stanley
Used 'mither' this morning in a post. We've covered it before but it occurred to me that there is a holding called Mither Close in Bracewell to the west of Stock. I wonder what that is rooted in.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 27 Jan 2012, 17:51
by Jill Harwood
Re thrutching - my dad used this word in connection with babies filling their nappies, and of course sometimes their top end would be posseting!

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 04:28
by Julie in Norfolk
http://www.lakelanddialectsociety.org/d ... _saxon.htm

:sad: Totally unsure how to post a web link (previously let alone now) however as some of my folks are from the lakes I have an interest and so do have a look at this website for words and origins. I won't bore you with any examples - just go there.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 04:39
by Stanley
Jules for someone who was unsure how to do it you did well!
Not too sure whether the following id dialect or just common usage. I heard a man on R4 describing buying a new pair of shoes that he described as 'Gangster Shoes', he meant the ones with contrasting black and white leather. I have heard these described as 'Child-Botherer's shoes', anyone come across that one? Just remembered that my old sergeant once told us that 'Brothel-Creepers' weren't allowed as part of civilian dress if you were going out of barracks at night. He meant the current vogue in the 1950s for shoes with very thick, soft, latex rubber soles.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 11:55
by Tripps
I think you mean "crepe soles" - beloved of the Teddy Boys in the 1950's

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 14:29
by catgate
tripps wrote:I think you mean "crepe soles" - beloved of the Teddy Boys in the 1950's
I think the teddy girls would be most insulted by that.
However from my recollections it would be pretty apposite in many instances.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 14:52
by Twinkletoes
A big argument I have with my friends is the name for a "Bread Roll" There are so many variations, but none of them call them T-Cakes or Butty

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 15:40
by Callunna
I vaguely recall a similar discussion in the early days of the old site, so it’s nice to bring the subject back up again, Twinkletoes.
It was always teacakes and currant teacakes round here, although when I moved to Manchester I learned to call them barm cakes. In Ashton-under-Lyne they’re muffins.
No doubt a long list will follow from other members! :chef:

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 20:36
by Bodger
Is it barm or balm ?

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 28 Jan 2012, 21:36
by Callunna
Definitely the former. Balm would be a bit too posh for Manky.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 29 Jan 2012, 06:10
by Stanley
David, yes but made from latex rubber. Balm or Barm, it's all yeast. Oven bottom cakes as well? Most modern name I have come across is 'frisbees' for the larger ones used to take a full breakfast. A good start to an outside job on a cold day. When I was working at Rochdale Welding that was always the first job as we arrived on site on a cold morning, find the nearest butty shop and get a Frisbee!

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 29 Jan 2012, 16:40
by Bodger
as anybody heard this before?,
EjIpjRG3t_s&feature=watch_response

another expression i recall in Sheffield for going down to the Wicker (part of SHEFFIELD)
"tha gus dahn to twicker to weer twatter runs oer tweer in tDon"

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 30 Jan 2012, 05:39
by Stanley
The bit of dialect I remember best is the trouble I got into in Accrington one day before I realised that 'who' meant 'he'. "Who's pinched my hammer" meant something completely different than what I understood. Not sure I ever heard that in Barlick.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 30 Jan 2012, 09:27
by Callunna
I understood it to be generally spelled “hoo” and meant “she”. I suppose it could have referred to a “he” but I only ever heard it used by and of my elderly female millworking relatives when I was a child. So definitely used in Barlick but probably not in recent (ie 50) years?

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 30 Jan 2012, 11:24
by Tripps
I'd always thought 'hoo' referred to either gender, but now you mention it - it's usually female. Perhpas that's because the men do more of the writing? That'll be today's project then.....


Here's an example from Edwin Waugh's poem.

When aw put little Sally to bed,
Hoo cried, 'cose her feyther weren't theer,
So aw kiss's the' little thing, an' aw said
Thae'd bring her a ribbin fro' th' fair;
An' aw gave' her her doll, an' some rags,
An' a nice little white cotton-bo';
An' aw kiss'd her again; but hoo said
'At hoo wanted to kiss thee an' o.

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 31 Jan 2012, 06:53
by Stanley
I never thought about the spelling as I thought he was saying 'who'. Thinking back, it was 52 years ago so coincides with Ian's estimate. (God. I must be getting old!)

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 31 Jan 2012, 16:34
by Bodger
not neccessary dialect, but some lovely old words
http://books.google.ie/books?vid=OCLC61 ... ker&f=true

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 31 Jan 2012, 17:44
by Belle
The Hoo is interesting in the poem above as it doesn't seem to be used to consistantly, there is a 'her' in the middle of the line..some sort of grammar rule about Her opening a sentence or bing in place of She? They still say Hoo for her in Catherine Cookson films...very North East!

Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Posted: 31 Jan 2012, 18:49
by Callunna
Stanley wrote:Thinking back, it was 52 years ago so coincides with Ian's estimate. (God. I must be getting old!)
Indeed you must - I think it was my estimate not Ian’s. But :itsok:

They still obviously use the dialect word ‘hoo’ at Burnley FC - big girls the lot of ‘em...
Hoo.jpg
From Barnoldswick & Earby Times 9 Feb 2012