Calendar of Lancashire Documents

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Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by PanBiker » 11 Jul 2014, 17:35

CALENDAR OF LANCASHIRE DOCUMENTS IN FOLDER ENTITLED LANCASHIRE MANUSCRIPTS.

This folder of 65 pages contains documents collected by William Waddington of Burnley. Not all pages are occupied by documents. The pages are numbered on the right hand in pencil by SG for identification. The pages of the folder are evidently very good quality paper, there is no discoloration due to acid reaction and the documents have survived well. They should be left as they are.




Calendar compiled by Stanley Challenger Graham BA (Hons), October 2000 for Mr and Mrs Waddington, Hen House Farm, Barnoldswick who are the owners of the papers.



Page 1.

Contains two indentures on vellum.

INDENTURE. Dated 13 January 13 James (1616)

Between John Kippax yeoman of Bradley and Richard Townley of Townley. The indenture relates that John Kippax leases to Richard Townley certain pieces of land adjoining the mill at Bradley for the purpose of enlarging the mill dam. Townley pays £2 for the lease but I can’t make out the period


INDENTURE. Dated 4 November 10 Henry VIII (1518)

Between Sir John Townley and Sir Nicholas Lee of Lynrode (Lyndroyd in Little Marsden?) Townley is buying or leasing lands in Marsden from Lee. I cannot decipher the sum or term.

Page 2.

A LETTER OF CONSULTATION WITH DR LUSHINGTON. (dated 22nd October 1831

On paper, attached note Suggest that W Waddington paid 1/- for the document.

The letter is to Dr Lushington and requests him to examine the legality of the actions of the incumbents of Christ Church Salford in the light of the fact that certain words were not inserted in an Act of Parliament as requested. No signature.

Page 3.

INDENTURE. Dated 4th July 1683.#

On Vellum, Originally signed and sealed by four commissioners(?)

This indenture is an order to the inhabitants of Blackburn to raise £107-13-11 by a tax on the inhabitants of Blackburn and surrounding districts to repair two bridges, Daveyfield Bridge and Blackburn Bridge. Appoints gentlemen of the town as overseers and contains a list of the amounts raised from the districts.

Page 4.

PROCEEDINGS TAKEN BY W SMITH OF LIVERPOOL WITH REGARD TO A BOND FOR £2,000 FROM MARY ANN AND RICHARD HOUGHTON.

On paper.Dated 9th February 1 George IV (1820) Signed at Westminster by Plumer and Johnson.

Appears to be judgement in favour of Smith preventing Mary Ann and William Houghton from acting against him in the matter of the bond. This seems to have something to do with the fact that the bond was guaranteed by the Mayor and Bailiffs of Liverpool.

Page 5.

VARIOUS PAPERS RELATING TO DR T D WHITAKER. FSA

1.Letter from Whitaker to Rev. William Roundell of Gledstone House, Near Marton, dated 4th October 1802. Whitaker is writing to Roundell to thank him for favours received in the matter of loan of documents, asking him to provide a box for the return of docs and promising to send a carrier over to Marton.
2.Surrender of a farm called Furnace Field Farm in Cliviger.dated 31 December 1805. It appears that Whitaker is renting the farm to James Walmsley for a yearly rent of £50.
3.Printer’s proofs of the Roundell pedigree intended for inclusion in Whitaker’s History of the Deanery of Craven. The proof page is certified by Roundell and the printer.
4.A magisterial document signed by Whitaker and his fellow magistrate Hollins referring to their judgement on a bastardy case on 6th August 1805. Mary Bamforth came before them delivered of a male bastard which she said was brought on her by John Harker. Harker is ordered to pay 13/- for the maintenance of the mother and child from the time of the birth until the day of the judgement and 15d. a week for as long as the child remained the responsibility of the parish of Worsthorn and Hurstwood. Further, the mother was ordered to pay 1/- a week if she did not take care of the child herself.
5.An exact copy of the land tax for Roughlee for the year 1758.

Page 6.

INDENTURE DATED 1ST AUGUST 1534

On vellum. Signed by John Townley.

Appears to be John Townley passing over lands in Marsden purchased by him from Sir Nicholas Lee (see 1518 indenture above)

Page 7.

A LEASE OF PADIHAM MILL DATED 7TH OF AUGUST ? HENRY VIII
(NO REGNAL YEAR DECIPHERED.)

On vellum signed by John Townley.

Appears to be John Townley leasing Padiham Mill and the tythe of Burnley to his son Charles. John is described as ‘of Hapton’ and Charles as ‘of Townley’.


Page 8.

INDENTURE DATED 14TH JULY, 10 CHARLES I (1634)

On vellum. signed John Ingham

Between Richard Townley of Townley and John Ingham of ? House. Seems to refer to the transfer of fifteen acres of land and some buildings at Ightenhill Ridge in Habergham Eaves.


Page 9.

No document.

Page 10.

INDENTURE DATED 7TH NOVEMBER 8 ELIZABETH I (1566)

On paper. Signed by William Gerrard and witnessed by Mat Bacon, Symon Hayworke and Gerrard Booth.

Between William Gerrard and John Townley of Hurstwood, Nicholas Barcroft of Habergham Eaves is mentioned also. Refers to the ’water corn mill called Padiham Mill’ together with soke and suite and all rights appertaining.

John Townley and Nicholas Barcroft appear to be acting as partners to buy the corn mill at Padiham from William Gerrard.

Page 11.

AN ACCOUNT OF SIEVE AND FAN AT PADIHAM MILL FOR THE YEAR 1714.
LOADS
John Birtwistle 122
James Howarth 40
John Dearden 34
James Crook 12
John Hoghonson[sic] 03
James Whittaker 16
Thomas Ingham 04
Allan John[sic] 09
Ellis Nutter 03
John Whittaker 11
Smith Whittaker 10
George William 47
James Sagar 11
Paul Sagar 07
George Haworth 11
Abraham Leigh 21
John Nogoton[sic] 18
John Bridge 17
Henry Clayton 14
Rich. Jafforson[sic] 03
Ambrose Hopwood 14
Henry Heap 07
John Ormerod 12
Robert Ryley 11
John Wilson 03
John Dikonson[sic] 15
John Harrison 02
Geo. Halstead? 09
Jonas Bordall 05
Miles Dryden? 12
? Pollard 10
John Haworth 05
Thos. Whitehead 06
James Whitehead 08
Mr Webster 15
John Cronkshaw? 05
John Bulcock 15
John Clog? 30
Law Jutolif[sic] 10
David Whitehead 11
Mirk Gryngham? 11
? Hoyle 13
? Topper 05
Lynal Dorran[sic] 04
? Ribchester 10
Thomas Wilkinson 15
? Colling? 27
George Whitehead 111
Peter Ormerod? 10
John Hargreaves 08
W? Bardson? 05
Mick Wilkinson 07
William Tattersall 15
Mick? Roberts 10
W Town 06
W Watson 05
Hon? Robinson 02
Total loads 802 [SG total 882]

At 1d per load £3-06-10 [SG total £3-06-10]
Received for home malt
Beans and barley £1-04-00
Total £4-10-10

Disburst
For sacks? £2-19-11-3/4
For two meal sieves 03-00-0
For goyt dressing 03-00-0
To Jon Robinson 11-02-1/2 (blacksmith)
For tallow and candles 14-05-1/4
Total disburst £4-11-07-1/2

An amount of home malt sold
9 aghondall at 10d per aghondall 7-6
8 aghondall at 9d per aghondall 6-0
7 aghondall at 8d per aghondall 4-8
10 aghondall of beans and
barley at 7d per aghondall 5-10
total £1-4-0

An amount of malt meal and wh[sic] oats sent to Townley
Malt 14 Loads
Wheat 5 Loads and one peck
Meal 7 Loads and one peck [oatmeal]


SG note: I can’t find ‘aghondall’ anywhere. Could this be the millers rendition of quintal, (about 200 lb) This seems too much for home consumption. Townley Hall were buying in bulk, they would do a lot of brewing.

Note: On page 19 of this folder is another set of accounts for Padiham Mill for 1714 which contain similar figures but are more comprehensive and better written. Perhaps the above is the miller’s version?


EXPLANATION OF ‘AGHONDALL’ IN MILL ACCOUNTS FOR SIEVE AND FAN FOR PADIHAM MILL FOR 1714.


It’s taken three weeks but I have finally bottomed the question of the ‘aghondall’. I consulted with various friends who are experts in this field but nobody had ever heard of it. Then I found a reference to a book by Ronald E Zupko, a member of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia called A DICTIONARY OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES FOR THE BRITISH ISLES. I ordered the book on the internet and lo and behold, I had found a treasure trove. Mr Zupko is or was, a dedicated scholar and his book is a mine of information. Here is what I found:


AGHENDOLE
6th C. akendoule; 6/7th C. aghendole; 7th aighendole; [perhaps from OE aghtand an eighth part, and dole, DOLIUM. {dolium is itself a measure used in ancient times for many quantities but most usually a TUN, liquid measure}]

A measure of capacity for grain in the counties of Lancaster and York and equal to approximately 1/8 of a COOMB or ½ a bushel.


This looks about right to me for a measure of ‘home malt’. The price agrees with the price of Scottish Malt at the same time so I think I’m satisfied.


Page 12.

ACCOUNT OF WHAT CORN HATH BEEN DRYED AT PADIHAM KILNE IN 1715.

Law Bramley 11
George Howarth 12
James Sagar 14
Abraham Leigh 23
Thos Wilkinson 30
Paul Sagar 08
James Howarth 34
George Brooks 12
Thos Whiteoak 15
Paul Sagar 08
Joseph Colling 50
Jonas Whittaker 22
Law Jutolif 24
Jo Ormerod 12
Jo Birtwistle 180
Jo Dearden 32
Jo Clog 36
Edwd Watson 04
Hon Barns 09
Jo Hoag 16
Hen Hargreaves 05
Jo Whitehead 06
Peter Ormerod 09
Jules Hoyle 15
Miles Dryden 18
Wm Dearden 10
Richard Tattersall 04
Richard Lawson 15
Jos Harker 04
630
Joshuah Hanson 52
Jon Parker 16
Jon Boldall 09
Jo Cronkshaw 11
Hen Robinson 07
Hen Cunlif 18
Mich Whittaker 10
Kames Whittaker 20
Jo Hoghonson 04
Wm Smith 05
Mich Roberts 21
George William 58
238
Jo Haworth 14
James Fielden 06
James Darwen 04
Jo Harrison 05
Jo Whittaker 18
George Haworth 03
Jo Crook 08
Jo Smith 05
Wm Shaw 10
J Hoskin 26
? Varley 04
Ellis Nutter 02
Jo Wilkinson 14
Jo Dickinson 14
Wm Lonsdale 07
Jo Hartley 30
Wm Tattersall 36
? Crossley 09
Hen Edmondson 07
Colling 06
? Bridge 36
? Webster 20
? Romsballam 12
? Barlow 07
Jon Soyyor 08
Smith Grimshaw 18
James Whittaker 02
Jo Hargreaves 09
Hen Claton 17
James Whitehead 06
Jim Pollard 05
>? Hogwonso 08
Mich Wilkinson 18
Rich Varley 04
William Ribchester 12
Jo Nowton 14
James Colly 04
Rob Dowers 24
David Whiteoak 09
Wm Wade 04
455
Total sum is 1322
At 1d per load is £5-10-2
Dried after making accounts last year 45 load
1323
Sum total 1368 load
1d per load comes to £5-14-0


Page 13.

A LIST OF THE NAMES OF ? BELONGING TO PADJHAM MILL DWELLING IN PENDLE, PADIHAM, AND HAPTON.

A list of names and dwelling places on paper and in almost illegible script.


Page 14.

AN ACCOUNT OF CORN DRIED AT PADIHAM KILNE IN THE YEAR 1712. JNO BOOTHMAN.

List on one sheet of paper in a good and tidy hand but written very small.

Hapton Loads
Law Brammonley 010
John Brooks 015
Mr Clegg 006
Abraham Lee 021
Jonas Whittaker 010
Hen Banner 006
Paul Sagar 005
James Sagar 014
John Dearden 048
John Sutcliffe 051
James Haworth 064
Jsath Collins 019
Thos Wilkinson 039
Law Sutcliffe 012
John Clegg 018
John Oldroyd 012
Hen Heap 008
John Wilson 126
John Lasty 006
John Dearden 016
R Ormeroyd 012
Rich Lawson 011
Gyles Hoyle 015
James Whitehead 012
John Wilkinson 006
John Crossley 011
John Harrison 005
Mr ? Webster 024
John Stephenson 004
Hen Cunliffe 007
Amos Hopwood 024
Hen Clayton 024
Roger Leach 001
James Crook 001
Thos Towser 003
John Cronkshaw 020
George William 046
James Boardall 011
John Haworth 008
Ellis Nutter 007
William Robinson 021
John Dickonson 005
Wm Whittaker 020
James Whittaker 026
Samuel dasson 002
Law Whittaker 018
John Whitehead 021
James Varley 006
John Smith 010
John Whittaker 018
Wm Shaw 019
Thos Robinson 008
John Hargreaves 012
Wm Lonsdale 009
John Dickonson 008
Widd Town 023
Band. Dickonson 004
John Dickonson 006
John Bridge 031
John Bulcock 029
Ed Varley 005
John Dugdale 005
James Fielding 020
Wm Ribchester 024
Robert Dewhurst 015
John Hartley 056
John Newton 015
Joshua Hanson 008
Thomas Anams 008
Mich Wilkinson 013
William Tattersall 020
Francis? ? 006
George Halstead 010
Ni Grimshaw 014
Henry Green 004
Lionel Dawson 006
David Whitehead 018
Mr Brogden 005
James Kelly 007
Nath Roberts 070
James Topper 008
Total 1347 @ 1d per load £5-12-03
Page 15.

March 23 1713
AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT CORN HATH BEEN DRIED AT PADIHAM KYLNE IN THE YEAR ABOVE.

John Bridge 020
Mr Grundy 002
James Crooks 014
Henry Clayton 030
John Smith 003
John Whittaker 010
John Dikonson 011
Ambrose Heywood 038
William Lonsdale 005
John Hopkinson 003
Richard Town 030
James Whittaker 020
John Hartley 025
John Crosley 009
Ellis Nutter 006
William Tattersall 023
Thomas Ingham 012
Mich Whittaker 008
John Dikonson 006
John Bulcock 021
John Haworth 010
Henry Cunliffe 003
John Dugdale 002
George Halstead 015
Mich Wilkinson 010
John Gannoll 008
Henry Edmondson 006
Mr Webster 021
Hen Webster 007
Christopher Varley 007
John Harrison 006
John Nutter 012
John Nowton 018
William Shaw 011
Charles Soyyer 006
James Kelly 005
Henry Robinson 004
William Ribchester 018
Mich Grimshaw 014
Jonas Bordall 007
John Cronkshaw 005
Robert Dewhurst 013
Mich Roberts 017
James Whitehead 009
David Whitehead 013
Jos Crooks 004
George Haworth 012
Law Bramley 009
John Ormerod 012
Jonas Whittaker 005
Joseph Collinge 030
Abraham Leigh 013
John Clog 028
Henry Heap 007
James Sagar 014
John Dearden 041
Daniel Sagar 009
Richard Lawson 006
Gyles Hoyle 015
Thomas Wilkinson 036
George Brooks 012
Mighole Clog 005
William Whittaker 002
Law Jutoliff 012
James Haworth 037
James Whitehead 012
Henry Barns 004
Richard Dearden 006
Miles Dryden 018
Tyth corn 009
Total 947
Corn dryed year last April after I made my accounts 41 loads
Totall 988 loads

Page 16.

AN ACCOUNT FOR SIEVE AND FAN PADJAM MILL 1713

Mr Grundy 01
James Crook 09
Henry Clayton 25
John Smith 02
John Whittaker 07
John Dickonson 08
Amb Hopwood 14
George Wrilling 26
William Lonsdale 04
John Stephonson 02
John Hargreaves 05
Fred Town 24
James Whittaker 14
John Hartley 17
Ellis Nutter 04
Jono Crossley 07
William Tattersall 14
Thomas Ingham 08
Mich Whittaker 06
John Dickonson 04
John Bulcock 14
John Haworth 06
Henry Cunliffe 02
John Dugdale 01
George Halstead 11
Mich Wilkinson 06
Jo Channol 05
Hen Edmondson 04
Mr Webster 14
Aramis Webster 04
Chris Varley 05
John Harrison 04
Jos Nutter 06
John Nowton 12
William Shaw 07
Charles Stopper 05
James Holley 03
Henry Robinson 03
William Ribchester 13
Mich Grimshaw 10
Jonas Bordal 05
John Cronkshaw 09
Robert Dewhurst 09
Mich Roberts 12
James Whitehead 06
David Whitehead 09
Jo Crook 02
George Haworth 08
Law Bramberly 06
Jo Ormerod 09
Jonas Whittaker 04
Isack Colling 25
Abraham Leigh 09
Jon Clog 20
Henry Heap 05
James Sagar 10
John Dowarden 28
Paul Sagar 06
Richard Lawton 03
Gyles Hole 10
Thomas Wilkinson 27
George Brooks 08
Michael Clegg 03
William Whittaker 01
Law Suttcliffe 08
James Haworth 27
James Whitehead 09
Henry Barney 03
Widow Dewarden 05
? Ormerod 07
Miles Aspden 12
Tyth corn 06

643 at 1d a load is £2-13-7

Page 17.

MARCH 24TH 1714 ACCOUNT OF CLIVIGER MILNE FOR THE PRESENT YEAR PAST. VIZ
£ s. d.
For sieve and fan this year 2-04-06
For drying corn this year 4-18-04
For grinding 61 loads of groats at 4d per load 1-00-04
Malt to Townley at sundry times 13 pecks at 4/-
A peck comes to [peck = pack?] 2-12-00
Malt now in the milne 12 pecks at same price
comes to 2-08-00 5-00-00
Wheat to Townley at sundry times 12 pecks at 4/-
A peck comes to in all 2-08-00
Eggs to Townley at sundry times 714 at 4d a score
Comes to in all 0-11-11
4 chickens at 8d and 8 chickens at 4d
a peace in all 0-04-02 0-16-01
? meales and groates supposed to be in the
?of this years moulture values of 16 loads of meals
at 22/- per load comes to in all 17-12-00
-----------
33-19-03

Disbursed on account of Cliviger Milne viz.
Paid miller’s wagon for this year 8-10-00
Paid for 50 yards of haircloth 2-10-00
Paid for six loads of coles 0-02-00
Paid the Smith’s bill 0-

[Quite puzzling really. The accounts are unfinished. There is one mistake, it should be 3 chickens at 8d to make it balance. Even more worrying is the price of malt and wheat at 4/- a peck. I don’t see how this can be right. 6 loads of coal only came to 2/- in total and the cost of malt in Lanarkshire in 1714 was about 18d a Winchester bushel which is 4 pecks. What worries me is the difference between 41/2d a peck in Lanark and 4/- at Cliviger. Creative accounting? Who knows.]
[I think there may be an explanation for the ‘peck problem’. In wool weight there is a measure called a ‘pack’ which is 240lbs, a useful unit because the price in pounds sterling per pack was the price per pound weight. In a later account on page 19 of this folio for Padiham mill in 1714, a ‘load’ is defined as five packs to the load and the price of malt is 19/- a load which is about 3/9 a pack. As this was bulk it agrees well with the price at Cliviger of 4/- if what I have read as peck is pack.]

Page 18.

UNDATED DOCUMENT ON PAPER WHICH APPEARS TO BE SIGNED BY GEORGE GRIMSER[?]

This refers to the Mills at Burnley, Padiham and Carr (?). It appears to be a judgement or opinion about rights of multure at these mills. (Multure was the right to receive a fee for grinding grain) I cannot decipher enough of it to make out whether an opinion was given on the levels of multure.

Page 19.

MARCH 24TH 1714. GROAST [?] GROUND AT PADJAM MILL THIS YEAR

On paper. Agrees with the account for sieve and fan on page 11. Unfortunately it has been stuck on to a backing paper. If held up to the light it is obvious that there is another list with amounts of money on the reverse.
£ s d
628 loads comes to at 4d per load 10-09-04
Sieve and fan this year for 802 loads @ 1d 03-06-10
Home malt, beans and barley sold 01-04-00
-----------
15-00-02
Oats dried this year at 1d a load. 1225 loads 05-02-01
Moults, malt to Townley at sundry times , 14
Loads one pack. Five packs per load comes to
At 19/- a load 13-09-08
Loads malt now in the milne, 1 ½ loads 01-08-06
Five loads one pack and one load now in
The milne at 16/- per load 05-00-00
Groats now in the milne supposed to be
30 loads at 16/- a load 24-00-00
Eggs at sundry times 880 at 4d per score comes to 00-14-08
-----------
64-15-01
Disbursement as by the Millars nots cofided by
What I have paid as by my books 13-01-07 ¼


DISBURSED UPON ACCOUNT OF PADJAM MILL VIZ.
£ s d
Paid for poor taxes at sundry times 02-10-00
Paid for ? land tax for one half year 00-09-11-3/4
Paid for two meal sieves 00-03-00
Paid for dressing the goits once 00-03-00
Paid for tallow and candles for one year past 00-14-05-1/4
Land tax for latter half year 00-09-00-1/4
Paid John Leigh miller his wagon for one year
Part owing now 08-00-00
Soo much paid Smith’s bill 00-11-02-1/2
---------------
13-01-07-1/4
Cash received of John Leigh 02-08-06-1/2
---------------
15-00-02
{Should be £15-10-1 ¾ )

Ditto received from William Boothman for drying oats
This year. 05-02-01


Page 20.

LEGAL DOCUMENT DATED 4TH OF MAY 1680 SIGNED BY JAMES BRINDLEY AND WITNESSED BY JAMES CROZIER (?) AND THOMAS WALMSLEY.

On Paper with seal. Notation on reverse states that the document came from the library of Carr Hall near Nelson and was obtained by William Waddington.

Know all men by these presents that I, James Brindley of Blackburn in the county of Lancs. ? for and in consideration of the sum of fifteen pounds of current English money of England ? and duly paid by Edward Rishton of Astley (?) in the said county (/) and guardian unto John Clayton of Brazenose College Oxon, minor, the said sum pd in full of all (?) bills bonds and demands whatsoever …………..

[Appears to be attesting that a debt of £15 has been paid for I know not what.]


Page 21.

LEGAL DOCUMENT UNSIGNED BUT DATED 27TH OCTOBER 1765.

On paper, with seal. Notation on reverse states it came from Carr Hall near Nelson, collected by William Waddington.

Lancashire County. To all high and petty constables and other civil officers whom it may concern in the said county and especially to

Whereas I have this day received information on oath of Ambrose Walton of Carry Bridge in the said county esquire that he the said Ambrose Walton in the ? of 8 of January past hired John Harrison late of Cliviger in the said county labourer to serve him as a common labourer for one year and that the said John Harrison did on Thursday past and without the knowledge or consent of his said master elope and run away and hath not yet returned to his service contrary to the form of the Statute in that case made and provided.

These are therefore in his Majesty’s name to require and command you to apprehend and bring the body of him the said John Harrison before me or some other of his Majesty’s justices of the Peace in and for the said county to be examined touching the promises above and further to be dealt with according to law. And that you do also give notice to the said Ambrose Walton when and before whom you do take the said John Harrison that he may then appear to make good his complaint ? fail not. Given under my hand and seal this twenty seventh day of October in the year of our lord 1765.

[Sealed but no signature.]


Page 22.

LETTER TO JOHN CLAYTON ESQUIRE FROM J BARCROFT DATED 8TH AUGUST 1763 AT GISBURN.

Dear Sir,

Pollard cannot recollect that he told me that Crooke said he had used part of the meal in his house and I do not chuse to press him further than desiring him to summon up all his recollection.

However Pollard says he confessed he made it for his present use and that he had never ground anything with you which I think could be evidence of him withdrawing his grist.

But you may remember that when he came to submit either you or I charged him with having ground grain away from your mill which he used in his house which he absolutely confessed or did not deny but I am pretty sure he confessed it and then you know it was proposed that he should come to me at Colne Fair but not doing that I wrote to him and he and Mr Bernard came to me on the 1st of June and not complying with our terms I sent for the writ on the 9th of January – I shall not like to be a witness but the above you know is truth and if necessary I shall evidence it though I think Pollard’s sufficient.

Crooke was like to confess the above or else when you charged him with withdrawing his grist what occasion was there for him to say he would submit and appoint a time for it. I think Johnny Hartley of Colne heard Crooke confess the above pray was it not in your passage that we talked with Crooke, I think it was. We must go forward, there’s no looking back. I doubt not you’ll prove the withdrawing they will never controvert that point nor any chance. And we are safe of catching him for wh grew[?]

I am Sir your most obliged here and after kinsman, J Barcroft.


Page 23

LETTER FROM J BARCROFT TO JOHN CLAYTON ESQUIRE DATED 6TH OF AUGUST 1763. GISBURN
On paper, signed J Barcroft.

Dear Sir,

I do not find that old Johnny can say anything material to the matter we wanted him to depose to. I asked him in so distant a manner that he hath not the least suspicion for what purpose the enquiry was made.

I do not doubt but Pollard’s evidence connected with my own will be sufficient to prove the withdrawing. Besides the two millers will prove his never bringing any grain to your mills and consequentially he must have ground it elsewhere.

Jack’s letter is enclosed, I doubt not his succeeding very well in the business which he is gone about.

A brief was sent to Mr Starkie yesterday and I have wrote to him tonight to desire he let Mr Moss see it and also to Mr Moss apprising him that the brief is in Mr Starkie’s hands and that he is desired to let him look at it.

I believe you have hit upon the true reason of Mr Bawden’s slackness in his operations. I fancy he liketh not his clients otherwise he would have been more alert than he has been. I will be obliged to you to let me know the moment Jack arrives and I will come over to Colne. The subpoenaing of the witnesses should be set about by Thursday at farthest. Pray have you and Nutter about Tilly Close cleared up. It will be a strong circumstance in your favour that the three freehold estates on Park Hill, Ing and Colthurst near Higham have always gone wither they pleased with their grain and if they have gone to Carr I believe they have ground for less moulture than the copyhold, it will not be amiss to enquire into this.

Bernard Crooke is still impertinent but I hope there’s a way to tame him.

I am, Sir, your most obliged servant and affectionate kinsman,

J Barcroft.


Page 24.

LETTER FROM THOMAS STARKIE AT PRESTON DATED 2ND OF AUGUST 1763.

On paper and addressed on outer wrapper to John Clayton Esq., at Mr Roger Slater’s, Clitheroe.


I received the favour of yours and the parcel of letters which I will take care to send away as directed. Mr Barcroft’s letter with a list of the special jury came safe to the Under sheriff and he sent out summonses immediately. Nicholas Starkie is at the seaside.

There are three views beyond sands (?) so that the common jurors for trials of causes are already struck and there are only five in Blackburn Hundred, viz., James Topper of Burnley, Robert Whittaker of Healey, James Hartley of Dunkenhall, Gilbert Hodson of Burnley and John Hobson of Hallows House.

Mr Barcroft promised to let me see the brief but I have not viewed any, I heartily wish you success and am, Your most humble servant Thomas Starkie.


Page 25.

LETTER FROM THOMAS STARKIE TO JOHN CLAYTON AT COLNE DATED AUGUST 6TH 1763


Dear Sir, I propose to be at Huntroyd on the 22nd of this month and stay two or three days in order to do two or three things that my brother thinks is necessary to be done and will take it as a particular favour if you will call there before the assizes and taste the wine and let me know what you think of it. When I last tasted it I thought it was very good and as it is now two years and a half older I hope it will be better and will have taken no harm. I am in hopes you will let me see you at Huntroyd for a day or two.

There being a special jury in your cause the Vouvio and Habeas Corpora must be different from those used in common causes and it will be proper for Mr Barcroft to have them ready made before the assizes. Also it will delay him and he will not get the cause so forward as he may expect. They will easily be made here for he may be a stranger to em. I am Your most humble and obedient servant, Thomas Starkie. Preston. Aug 6th 1763.


Page 26.

LETTER ADDRESSED TO AMBROSE WALTON ESQ, CARRY BRIDGE, COLNE, YORKSHIRE (BRADFORD BAG) DATED 16 MAY 1773 AND SIGNED BY J CLAYTON, COCKSPUR STREET (?)

Dear Ambrose, our report was carried into the House yesterday, and yesterday only. It contains 302 pages of very large paper. The next Friday is fixed for the debate and I have a notion we shall have the day but the fate of a battle is sometimes uncertain. Epsom Races rob us of many of our friends and as they hold the whole of this week I fear we shall not see them return in due time to secure our purpose. But cool generals should not repine at bad success when they are conscious they have not been wanting in effort noir assiduity. I thank you for yours of last night, pardon me tho’ I mean yours that I received last night and am glad to hear you are pretty well. Your matter was finally settled, the money paid and ? discharged yesterday and I give you joy. We had a consultation on it and tho I at first fought shy, yet at last I gave way, being told the future expense might amount to more than £300Thompson’s attorneys bills amount to near £46, they demanded 55 Guineas but Winchley gave them £50 and they discharged the rule. It has cost you by much too large a sum. But as you was in the scrape and all the sides fought, Davenport and Winchley with others in town pressed in agreement. I thought it more prudent to concur with them in sentiment for they said a few days would enhance the costs very much. The Blackguard wanted a sum to be paid to him by way of an acknowledgement but that we objected to and this is a gross sum paid by way of discharging costs I wish you may think me have done right. I have not time to say more, the Post Bell is ringing My best respects to your Mother, I am, dear Ambrose yrs sincerely, J Clayton.12th of May 1773, Cockspur Street.

Your cousin with Higgs, ? and myself dined today with Sir Thomas Egerton.


Page 27.

LEGAL DOCUMENT . DATED 16TH NOVEMBER 1631. SIGNED EDWARD MOSLEY. AN INJUNCTION FORCING WILLIAM ATKINSON TO GRIND HIS CORN AT SIR JOHN RAMSDEN’S HUDDERSFIELD MILL

On paper. Very small hand. Good condition.

Superscript in Latin: Edward Mosley [attorney?] John Ramsden [plaintiff] …William Atkinson.[Defendant]

Whereas it is set forth by the information that the late King James was seised as in his demesne of fee in right of his highness’s father of land of and in certain water corn mills called Huddersfield mills situate lying and being within His Majesty’s manor of Almondbury parcell of His Majesties said Duchy within the county of York to which said mills all the tenants as well freeholders and copyholders of any land within the said manor of Almondbury and all residents and inhabitants within the said manor did owe and since whereof the memory of man is not to the contrary had owed and still done suit and soke and ground at the said mills all their corn and grain growing upon their grounds within the said township of Almondbury or bought in the market and spent in their houses within the said township and paid the usual ? for the same and that the said King James so being of the said mills seised did by his letters patent dated the 22 day of March in the eighth year of his reign over England (1611) grant convey and assure the said mills with the soke and suit thereunto belonging in fee farm unto Felix Wilson and Robert Morgan and their heirs for and under a certain sum yearly fee farms rent payable unto his Majesty his heirs and successors in right of his said Duchy of Lancaster and that by force thereof the said Felix Wilson and Robert Morgan were lawfully seised of the said mills with suit and soke thereunto belonging is since by good conveyance and assurance come to the relator Sir John Ramsden and his heirs for and under the said yearly fee farm rent payable to His Majesty his heirs and successors in right of the said Duchy and that by force thereof, the said Sir John Ramsden the relator is lawfully siesed to him and his heirs of and in those mills called Huddersfield Mills and that the defendant William Atkinson being tenant resident and inhabitant within the said town and township of Almondbury and owing suit soke service and suit customary to the said mills hath withdrawn his soke and suit to the said mills and had persuaded other inhabitants in the said township of Almondbury who ought soke and suit to the said mills to grind their corn and grains growing within the said township and likewise bought in the market and spent in their dwelling houses at other neighbouring mills and not at the said Huddersfield Mills by reason whereof the said relator had lost his toll due for that corn and the said soke and suit which tendeth to the ? of His Majesty in his fee farm rent for the said Huddersfield Mills is alleged in and by the said information and therefore prayed ? against the said William Atkinson to which information the said defendant answered and by his answer did acknowledge and confess that all freeholders copyholders and tenants of the said manor of Almondbury and the residents and inhabitants thereof had ground all their corn and grain growing upon any of their lands within the said township and spent in their houses at Huddersfield Mills in the information mentioned and that they ought so to do but they were at liberty to grind all their bought corn and market corns spent in their houses at any other mills at their pleasure and that the tenants freeholders copyholders and inhabitants were not bound or owed suit nor had used to grind their bought or market corns at the said Huddersfield Mills and the defendant confessed that he was an under tenant of freehold lands and an inhabitant of the said Almondbury to which answer there was a replication put in and full issue joined and a commission awarded and ? out of this court for examination of witnesses in this case and the same executed and returned into this court and publication thereof granted and this day down for hearing of the same cause which cause was heard by the Right Honourable the Chancellor of this court being assisted by Sir Thomas Trower[?] Knight one of the Barons of his Majesty’s Honourable Court of Exchequer at Westminster and one of the judges assistant of this court upon full hearing and debating whereof by counsel learned on both sides forasmuch as the court was fully satisfied that the precedents of this court have from time to time been so ? all His Majesty’s tenants freeholders copyholders and their under tenants and all other inhabitants and residents of his Majesty’s manors do grind as well all such corns and malt as they spent in their houses at His Majesty’s mills within the same manors as their corns growing within the same bounds and manors orders and decrees that in divers causes in this court appeareth And for that the defendant Atkinson in and by his answer did acknowledge that he was an inhabitant resident and under tenant of freehold lands within the said manor and township of Almondbury. It is therefore ordered and decreed by the Right Honourable the Chancellor and council of this court notwithstanding the ? books remaining with the Auditor of this court and now showed forth in the defendant’s behalf that the said defendant Atkinson so long as he shall be and continue a tenant or inhabitant within the said manor of Almondbury shall still from time to time hereafter bring all his corns grains and malt which shall be at any time hereafter spent in his house at Almondbury as well such as he shall buy as all such corn as he shall have growing within the township of Almondbury to the relators said water corn mills called Huddersfield Mills there to be ground and shall not carry or bring the same nor any such thereof to any other mill or mills. Nevertheless it is ordered that if the said defendant’s corn cannot or be not ground at the relator’s mill within 24 hours after the same shall be brought to his mill that then the said defendant shall be at liberty to carry the same corn to be ground where he pleaseth and an injunction is hereby awarded to that purpose.

[Signed] Edward Moseley.

{mention of another precedent, Fairfax V Frankland concerning the same matter.)


Page 28.

DOCUMENT GIVING COUNSEL’S NOTES OF PRECEDENTS CONCERNED WITH SOKE OF MILLS, AND ANSWERS GIVEN TO PARTICULAR QUESTIONS BY SIR EDWARD MOSELEY, ATTORNEY OF THE DUCHY [LANCASTER]

On paper, fine hand, probably relates to the injunction noted above. Not dated or signed.

Starts with a list of precedents:

9th January, 19 Jacob (1622) at Caernarfon.
Between Griffin Madrin)?) his majesty’s fee farmer of a mill in Bodewan {Bodelwyddan?] and John Wynne and other defendants.

The defendants and all the tenants and inhabitants within the township of Bodewan ordered to grind all their corn at the plaintiff’s mill except the same cannot be ground within 24 hours.

5th February 19 Jacob (1622) at Ebor. (York)
Between Sir John Gibson Knight owner of an ancient mill in Kirby Moorside purchased of his majesty plaintiff and William Denton clerk and others defendants.

A mill newly erected by some of the defendants ordered to be pulled down and Denton to grind all his corns at the plaintiff’s mill except the same cannot be ground there within 24 hours.
26th of May, 20 Jacob (1623) Sussex.
Between Sir John Saville Knight farmer of his majesty’s mill Ashurst(?) mill in the manor of Shesworth(?) plaintiff and Richard Constable defendant.

It is ordered that a mill newly erected by the defendant be pulled down.

3rd February 20 Jacob. (1623) Montgomery.
Between Lodowike Middleton his majesty’s fee farmer of an ancient mill in the township of Churchstock and Hindley plaintiff and Richard Ap Humphry defendant.

The defendant ordered a mill by him now being erected in prejudice of the King’s Mill.


The Manor of Accrington being a Coppol (?) Manor whereof his majesty is Lord as the Duke of Lancaster which is a large and spacious manor and having within it and part of the same sundry little manors as Haslingden Huncoat and there is an ancient water corn mill near to the site of the great manor called Accrington Mill where most of the inhabitants of the said manor except those of Haslingden and Huncoat have time out of mind used to make and grind their corn gotten and dispent within the same. The most part of the copyhold inhabitants of Huncoat had come to the said mill at Accrington which mill is now sole in fee farmed by AW and in Haslingden there is likewise an ancient mill. Mr Ashton of Chadderton hath a demesne and rents of freehold lands within the said manor of Huncoat which is far remote from Accrington Mill viz. two miles and the inhabitants thereof have time out of mind ground their corn at Altham Mill or elswhere they pleased for ought can be proved.

Question. Whether the owner of Accrington Mill may by law compel Mr Ashton and his rents to come to Accrington Mill in respect of the said lands being within the precinct of the great manor or that he and his rents may grind at their pleasure as they have done.

The township of Huncoat within his majesty’s manor of Accrington consisting of both copyhold and freehold land have been accustomed to make or grind their corn and grains and pay their moulture and soke at his majesty’s mill within the said manor called Accrington Mill. Saving that some of the inhabitants of Huncoat aforesaid in respect of their freehold lands had sometimes made corn and paid moulture at a mill within the Lordship of Altham which said Accrington Mill together with all soken belonging the same the Kings Majesty hath sold in fee farm.

Enquire whether the said freeholders of Huncoat being holden of his majesty and being within his said manor may be lawfully compelled to make or grind their corn or grain and pay their moulture and soken at the said mill of Accrington.

Answered affirmatively


Question. Enquire also whether such persons as are licensed to sell ale within Huncoat may be lawfully compelled to grind their malt and pay moulture at the said mill of Accrington although the malt may be bought forth of the said manor of Accrington.

Answered affirmatively.

Question. The township of Accrington within the said manor of Accrington being accustomed to pay their suit and soken at a mill there called Holden Mill which is also sold in fee farm saving that the demesnes of Ewood in Haslingden aforesaid being freehold lands have for about the space of three score years last past had a mill within the said demesne for the use of the same which mill hath been ruinated and decayed for about seven years last past. Enquire whether the said mill may be lawfully builded again for the use of the said demesne.

Answered negatively.

These answers were made by Sir Edward Moseley attorney of the Duchy.

Page 29.

COPY ON PAPER OF A LEGAL DOCUMENT. CERTIFIED BY WILL HOGHTON.

[The first half of the document is in Latin but I can pick out the words,5 May, 15 Elizabeth. (1573) Bolland, Slaidburn, William Haughton, Gent and his son Richard Haughton in the first para.

It looks as though the first three paras may be precedents as they all mention different reigns.

In second para there is a list of names; Edward Parker, Radi Salber?, John Bond, Cuthbert Hairst, John Wallbank, Robert Parker, Robert Knowles Junior, Thomas Leeming, Robert Lee, Adam Turner, Adam Hatfield, Orofort Rumgill, John Croasdale of Bashall, Thomas Siddall of Waddington, James Brisley

Third para, Robert Bannister Gent, William Bannister, William Hyde, Robert Swinglehurst, Thomas Procter of Woodhouse, Robert Slater, ? Parker, Robert Brennand, Ambrose Bolton, George Mitton, William Harrison, Michael King, William Taylor, William Parkinson, Thomas Shutt, Edward Heaton and Richard Waddington.]

Patrick Hodgkinson, Christopher Smythson and Thomas James of the age of four score years or thereabouts sworn and examined the day and year above written (5 May 1573?) between Nicholas Tempest, gent and the freeholders and copyholders of Rishton award, Hapton award and Slaidburn Knowle award and the Forest concerning the suit service and soke which they and sundry of them do owe her majesty’s Mill of Slaidburn. Deposeth and saith that about three score years last past there was not any mill among the said places except the Mill of Slaidburn and the Mill of Essington and further the said deponents saith that in Sir Stephen Haughton’s time the tenants of Knowle award did go with their corn to Haughton Mill and in going was stopped and their corns taken down by one Forto ? who was then miller of Slaidburn Mill at a place called Cawd Gate ? when and at which time Robert Parker of Knowle who was bailiff to the said Sir Stephen and one of the said tenants did put his horse in pledge to pay their moulture to the said Nicholas Tempest who was then farmer of her majesty’s mill of Slaidburn. And lastly those deponents said that all the freeholders and copyholders aforesaid of right ought to come and bring their corns to her majesty’s mill of Slaidburn aforesaid. [Sentence in Latin]

Will Hoghton.


Page 30.

LETTER TO MR LOVAT OF BARCROFT, NEAR BURNLEY. FROM C. TOWNLEY DATED LONDON, 29 JUNE 1803

Mr Lovat,
Your letter of the 24th inst came duly. I am glad to have so clear a statement of the farmer nearly out of lease as the one which you have sent to me.

I think you have managed as well as circumstances would admit the troublesome repairs of your chancel at Burnley. I am persuaded you will have obstinate and ignorant people to deal with , who will require watching. Ed Lee ought to be the last man to contend the Townley right to the Lordship of Hapton. But there is no expecting just sentiment from such people. Hapton is certainly a manor granted to the Townley, of which the deeds are still existing, besides being recorded in Dodsworth and other authentic writers. But owing to the difficulties the family have endured in religious acts and in the Civil War of Charles the 1st’s time, I think the ceremony of court holding has been discontinued but the family has always received rents for cottages on the wastes and for stone of ‘V’.

I am glad you advise Mr Forshaw in making up his accounts, pray do all you can for him. We set out for Standish on Monday next if nothing prevents us. I will write again. I am, Sir, very truly yours &c.

C Townley.


Page 31.

LETTER TO ED. LOVAT, LAND SURVEYOR, PRESTON, LANCASHIRE. FROMC TOWNLEY AT LONDON. DATED 18TH OF APRIL 1803

Mr. Lovat,
I had the pleasure yesterday to receive your account of the prosperous sale you have made for me of the wood. You have shown great exertion and good management in the process of this sale, and I sincerely give you joy in the success you have had. I can easily conceive, that, as a stranger in the neighbourhood, you may have met with some jealousies and some impediments from persons who are either jealous of you, or are afraid of you, but you must not mind such contemptible proceedings.

I need say no more at present, I will write to you more at leisure, and all thinks[sic] I hope before long will be settled to your comfort. Mr Forshaw I suppose has received last week the half yearly rents but I have not heard from him. He professes that he will immediately communicate to you my concerns and advise with you. I hope therefore that by gentle degrees you will assist him for the present in making out his accounts for the close of the year at midsummer, and also learn from him all the necessary documents for the overlooking the farms that require soon new contracts. I am very truly yours &c., C Townley.

How goes on the repairs at Barcroft.

Page 32.

PART LETTER TO MR LOVAT FROM C TOWNLEY(?) AT STANDISH DATED 18TH OF JULY 1803. [PART TORN OFF AND MISSING]

Mr Lovat,
I forgot to leave with you Mr Henry and Co bill for the soda water. It amounts to £1-17-6. But tho’ a trifle, these manufacturers of water expect to be paid ready money. I beg therefore that you will send to him that sum by one of our Manchester carriers as soon as you can.

In regard to our meeting and conversation with Beauchamp upon rebuilding the outward wall of Townley Chancel, I see no impediment against you immediately agreeing for the rebuilding that outward wall, taking down the pier ? the windows on the North side only as far ? the level of the present opening of the ? and taking down only two courses ? angle wall because it is presumed ? the said two courses are taken down ? remainder of the wall will prove to be / perpendicular. In short as much as is yet possible to retain of the ancient appearance of the old outside wall is to be preserved and restored. To effect this it must be done by day work under your own direction , or of someone that you can trust, for you well know how necessary it is to watch every stone to be laid or moved by these masons on such occasions as this and that they must not be lost sight of during the operation. There is time enough to decide on the disposition of the inside of our chancel after the outwalls are renewed. The arrangement of the ground floor will be very little altered from its original state because you know every attom of the monuments and decorations are to be replaced as they first were , and even the old dec? and square divisions of the ceiling ? replaced on the new ceiling which w? elevated by about ten feet higher ? to one and also continue to?


Page 33.


LETTER TO LOVAT AT TOWNLEY NEAR BURNLEY LANCASHIRE FROM CHARLES TOWNLEY AT LONDON DATED 2ND OF MARCH 1804.

Sir,
I before informed you that I am laid on my back with a decided attack of the gout in the foot and the knee.

This being about the time when I made the agreement last year with Dr Whitaker for the copyhold coal in Cliviger for one year, being the term, during which I take annually the agreement for those mines under the Lords of Clitheroe. It is proper that I renew also my agreement for a year with Dr Whitaker, as undertenant, inserting in it the same clauses powers and restrictions which are in my contract from Clitheroe, adding that he is to pay to me above the rent I now pay to the Lords of Clitheroe, the same surplus he used to pay under my former leaves which I think was £70. You may ascertain this by the old accounts and you must announce to him that as I intend to inclose my allotment of Low Side I must wholly reserve to myself the power of working for sale the quarries of slate or stone that lie either within Low Side or near it, for I will not submit to the inconvenience of perhaps the control of other people to whom Dr Whitaker might, without this reserve, underlet these quarries. This reserve must positively be inserted in my next agreement with Dr Whitaker.

Should any good slate or flaggs be found in that quarter, it is not my present intention to get any for sale. But the landowners in Cliviger, for their own use, will be advantaged by any discovery of good stone we find in getting materials for our new walls on Lowside. I will certainly join our Hapton Coal Company in compelling the Canal Company to pay at the rate of £600 per acre for the quantity of coal which cannot be got for fear of damage to the canal, or to themselves by letting the canal water into the hollows. It is an absurdity as well roguery in the Canal Company to be expected to be exempted from paying for coal which might easily be got if the canal did not exist, and which now cannot be got on account of its existence. I am scarcely able to write, this being wrote lying on my back but I am flattered that this gout will relieve me from the more serious oppressive attack in my stomach. I remain, Dr. Sir, very truly yours &c. Chas. Townley.

I have sincerely regretted, in common with all his friends, the loss of Mr Sam. Fletcher. If you can purchase the mare he bought of you at a price not too high, I should like to have her to bread[sic] with the Suffolk.


Page 34.


LETTER TO MR ED. LOVAT, TOWNLEY, NEAR BURNLEY, LANCASHIRE. FROM CHARLES TOWNLEY AT LONDON DATED 30TH OF MAY 1804.

Dr. Sr.

I have transcribed on the other side a copy of the letter I have this day sent to Mr Haw in order that you may see it and be prepared for any comments which Mr Haw may communicate to you in consequence of it. I hope that it may cause him to act more cordially and with more civility and warmth with you in expending all your directions and wishes he receives from you in my concerns, or that he will quit his situation as not suitable to his disposition.

My former letter to you will also I hope contribute to effect harmony and concord betwixt Mr Eley and Johhny Ryley by its specifying more clearly their departments in which [?hole in paper] must reciprocally assist each other as occasion happens.

I thank you for your last short statement of casuals.

The bridge broke last winter at the top of the Thanat Lee should be well repaired with an arch or with long rough flags supported with good side walling.

The unfinished slopes in the Broad Ing along the length of the bank fence should be smoothed and sowed with grass seeds on some good earth. The slopes also of moved earth in Jacob’s barn yard should be finished with proper channel for the water, as it was described when I was at Townley or any other way you think better.

I only mentioned the repair of Hucklehurst as a proper work to do, but pray only do it when you think we do it easily. Perhaps we have irons in the fire enough for this year.
Truly yours &c. C Townley.

Copy of my letter to Mr Haw, 30th of May 1804.

I can no longer delay inquiring what can be your reason for not having given me regularly once per week a statement of the work in which my labourers, under your inspection are employed. I desired to have such a statement and you formerly sent it to me pretty punctually. But since I left Townley, if I had not lately desired Mr Lovat to give me some account of the works committed to you, I should know nothing of them.

You cannot be ignorant that your employment in my service is to superintend the works that are ordered by me or Mr Lovat and to cause them to be properly executed. As to the common rotation of Minute Works such as keeping all the pleasure grounds and walks in proper order, common operations in the farm yard and on the farm, the management of the cattle etc., those are Minute and Regular works and on course to be attended to by you without your waiting for specific orders.

Previously to my leaving Townley I recommended to you to conduct yourself towards Mr Lovat in an open and friendly manner, receiving and following his directions in all casual operations, giving freely of your opinion for the good of my concerns both to me and to him, and cooperating with good will towards fulfilling his wishes and directions in all the undertakings we adopt. How far your conduct and behaviour to Mr Lovat in these regards have coincided with my recommendations to you , I am as yet ignorant. I have however observed that ever since Mr Lovat has succeeded Mr Forshaw as my chief agent you have performed the duties of your station with much inattention, coldness and moroseness.

Such proceedings and behaviour in my household are both injurious to my interest and very unpleasant to all parties, rendering my house a scene of discord. It is incumbent upon me to put a stop to such disagreeable circumstances and it can only be effected by your quitting the employment you hold under me, or by your conducting yourself in a more satisfactory manner to me and with more affability and cordiality to those who act with you in my concerns.

You began to lose my good opinion of your understanding by your expressing in your letter of 12th April 1803 such a silly, absurd and self sufficient contempt of Mr Lovat’s abilities in farming and management of land. I will forbear at present to make any comparisons betwixt his talents and yours, but I will candidly tell you that your knowledge in farming and in the nature of soils does not answer the favourable account which my nephew gave me of it.

I am however sensible of many good qualities which you possess and I am fully persuaded of your integrity. Your remaining with me should you desire it shall therefore depend on yourself, that is your acting towards my chief agent with civility and cordiality forwarding attentively all the directions he may give you for the good of my concern with your activity and good will.

Uncivil behaviour and coarseness of manners in domestic intercourse denote a want of sense, vulgar education and a brutish disposition of mind. Such characters are the bane of domestic society and shall not be permitted to exist in my family if I can prevent it.

As Mr Lovat must now prepare to make up the general accounts for the year, ending the 24th of last month, you will deliver to him as soon as possible the whole state of the disbursements and receipts in the farming account that have passed through your hands from the 24th of June 1803 to Do. Of this, because it must be invested in the General Account. The precise balance of the farming accounts that you kept during the last two years was not regularly ascertained when I left Townley. I shall therefore direct Mr Lovat to make an audit of those preceding farming accounts which you will lay before him and assist him as far as you can to render them clear and to draw a final balance,

I remain, Mr Haw, your well wisher, Charles Townley.


Page 35.


LETTER TO EDWARD LOVAT FROM JOHN TOWNLEY DATED 16TH OF JUNE 1804 FROM DEVONSHIRE PLACE, LONDON.

On gold edged paper with an addition by Charles Townley.

Sir,

This morning I received your last letter and have had an explanation with my nephew concerning the Wastes adjoining the Hartley Lands & I request that you will immediately secure the purchase and not suffer them to pass into other hands at what ever price they may go at.
I am, Sir, your humble servant, John Townley.


Mr Lovat, I profit of this sheet, wrote at my house, to congratulate you on your rational plan for the regulation of the rates [or water?] in Habergham. I am surprised at the proposition made by Mr Hargraves. It militates both against the spirit of the Act and against common proportionate justice. I think you have fought a very good fight in the meeting at Habergham.

You would add much clearness in letters by specifying the receipt and the date of the last letter received.

I hope to hear from you by the post of next Monday which you will have wrote on this day.

Our carpenter Sager may as well be accommodated with the little cottage in Burnley Wood. He has no family and will leave it when required and must only have it from year to year. You did not at first say it was for Sager. I will wait your next to say more.

Most truly yours &c. C Townley


Page 36.


LETTER FROM CHARLES TOWNLEY TO EDWARD LOVAT AT TOWNLEY NEAR BURNLEY. DATED 2ND OF JULY 1804.


Dr. Sir,

In my hurry of writing to you of the 29th ult. I forgot to desire you to direct James Folds or some proper person to paste up immediately the first coat of common paper on the walls of the tribune (?) that is on the side walls that are plaistered and on the new wood partition that divides it from the library. I wish that this first coating of paper may be done directly that it may have time to dry and be ready to receive the outward paper which is now on its road from hence to Halifax and to Townley, with the border, and which I beg may be also put up as soon as possible when it arrives so that the tribune may be ready for use, and make a better appearance to the company, who will soon use it.

I beg also to know if Mr Machiver have made any progress towards conveying more completely and regularly the water to turn the kitchen jack. He promised to completely execute this job before last Easter as also the pump for the brewhouse.

The case which I sent by the Canal to be delivered at Todmorden to Dr Whitaker his(?) order, mentioned in my former letter, set out on the 2nd of this month and ought to have arrived in 14 days. So that if it is not arrived, Dr Whitaker should be requested to enquire for it at the Canal Warehouse in Manchester and advice thereof should also be sent to me. Of course you will have apprised the Dr that the bag of grass seeds in that case is for me.

I remain dear Sir, very truly yours, Chas Townley.

London. Monday 2 July 1804.

If Mr Machiver have not finished the jack business pray write to him to press and urge him to finish it.

Page 37.


AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT CORN HATH BEEN DRIED AT PADIHAM KILNE IN 1714.

On paper.


George Brooks 16
Thomas Wilkinson 22
George Haworth 15
Law Bramley 14
Jonas Whittaker 21
Abraham Leigh 34
James Sagar 15
Paul Sagar 09
James Whitehead 28
James Haworth 60
Jo. Clog 36
Jo. Ormerod 16
Robert Ryley 15
Henry Barns 09
Richard Lawson 18
Jo. Deardon 41
Wd Watson 06
Joss Harking 11
Joseph Colling 37
Richard Tattersall 04
Jo Birtwistle 147
Henry Heap 09
Law Jutilif 20
Peter Ormerod 13
Richard Davison 06
Gyles Hoyle 20
Henry Hargreaves 06
Miles Dryden 18
Thomas Whitehead 08
Jonas Crook 15
Jo Hodgkinson 05
George Halstead 13
Henry Clayton 22
William Shaw 12
Richard Whittaker 15
Jo Hanson 28
Jo Bridge 27
George William 41
Ellis Nutter 05
Christopher Varley 04
Jo Whittaker 16
Thomas Ingham 08
Jo Holden 06
Henry Parker 16
Ambrose Hopwood 17
James Whittaker 24
Jo Harrison 04
Chas Colling 08
Henry Cunliffe 05
Jon Boldall 08
Jo Dickinson 02
Jo Hargreaves 11
Mich Wilkinson 11
Jo Newton 27
Fra Worston 19
Robert Dewhurst 12
Henry Topper 06
Jo Haworth 08
James Colley 06
Mich Grimshaw 16
William Ribchester 12
Jo Bulcock 23
David Whitehead 14
Jo Cronkshaw 07
Jo Smith 04
Mich Roberts 12
Henry Robinson 04
Total 1225 loads

The total sum of loads is 1225 at a penny per load is £5-02-01


Page 38

ACCOUNTS FOR BRADLEY MILL. MARCH 24TH 1714

March 24th Bradley Milne CR 7114
By moulture malt sold at sundry times 3-01-07
By moulture wheat sold 2-03-02
By corns dried 3d per load 13-09-09
By sieve and fan 3-07-07
By durt sold 60 packs at 2d per pack 10-00
By groats grinding, 13 loads 22-16-05
By moulture groats supposed to be in the milne
30 loads 5 packs per load and valued to be worth
18/- a load 24-00-00

Total 46-16-05
Groats supposed to be in the milne 24th day of March 1714 viz. 30 loads5 packs per load.

March 24th Bradley Milne Dr. 1714
Paid 12 poor boys? This year 18d per boy 00-18-00
Paid the land tax for this year 00-19-06
Paid for 3 loads of lime 00-01-06
Paid for 39 yards of hair cloth 01-19-00
Paid for polls? To skill? the moulture 00-01-06
Paid for straw for coding? The kilne 00-07-03
Paid for 4 lbs of candles 00-01-09
Paid the smith’s bill for ironwork 00-10-00
Paid the drysters wagon 1d per load 04-09-11
Paid the miller’s wagon for a year ending now 07-10-00
Total 16-19-11

To balance for so much 29-16-06
46-16-05


Page 39


LETTER WRITTEN BY CHARLES TOWNLEY FROM SLIGO. APRUIL 9TH 1847.

Dear Sir, in my hurry I forgot to tell you that the tenants may have the coals screened in future. In regard to the Worsthorne Enclosure. Let me have a line directed to London so that I may get it on Friday or Saturday next to say whether Easter week would do for the meeting I am not sure I can get to Townley for that week but I will tell for certain when I get to London where I hope to be on Thursday next.

With regard to the tithes, you had better consult with Mr Leach, I am willing to do whatever the other parties are willing to do but I can’t see how we can pay the money until the agreements are completed.

Do Michael Taylor and Whalley with the tythe payees so purchase their tythe separately or conjointly.

This letter is too late for today’s post so shall keep it open to let you know the result of the polling which takes place tomorrow. I have a majority of pledges but my opponent Mr Somers is moving heaven and earth to beat me so I am rather anxious.

Yours most truly, Chas. Townley.

½ past one
Townley 125
Somers 112
Majority 13 I am considered safe.
Page 40.


WORK DONE FOR THE MILL AT PADIHAM BEGINNING APRIL 27TH 1715 BY BERNARD ROBINSON.

A bill or invoice on paper presented and receipted by Bernard Robinson.
S d
For mending an old peck 00-03
Fir making a band for an arm of a wheel 00-07
For mending a dog from ? 00-02
For lapping of gudgeon and mending the rinde? 01-03
For making wedges 00-01
For making a chisel 00-03
For making a turn link for a chain 00-01
For making hoops and hasps and mending
Picks and other ironwork for the stones 01-04
For nails 00-011/2
For lapping of spindle and fastening it 02-00
For making a sock for fan pole 00-04
For a pair of bands and gudgeons 01-06
For sharpening one spear? 02-05
10-051/2

Received the contents of this bill
Bern. Robinson


[The following is on the reverse of this bill.]

6 loads of groats 14/- per load 4-04-00 11-01-01
1 load at 0-14-00
1 load at 0-14-00 13-14-091/2

43.13.1143-13-11
31-00-021/2
12-13-081/2
05-14-00
07-19-081/2


Page 41.

A RECEIPT FOR POLICE RATES AND SERVICES FOR 1829 PRESENTED TO EDWARD LOVAT BY JOHN HALL.

1829.Mr Edward Lovat
To the Constable of Habergham Eaves debtor
October 14th to apprehending Robert William for felony
And expenses before committed £0-10-0
1-08-1
1-18-1
Settled, John Hall. Lovat


Page 42.


LETTER ON GOLD EDGED PAPER SIGNED P G TOWNLEY. DATED 25TH JUNE 1846, FROM PARK ? WESTMINSTER.

On gold edged paper.

You have my sanction for letting 360 yards at two pence per yard for building purposes to the shuttle maker. (you do not mention his name) and also the use of the spring for domestic purposes and condensing the water for his engine and he may further have the privilege of taking water from Bearshaw Tower on paying for the same ten shillings per annum. Of course you will let me know whether I have the liberty to let the water required without interfering with former engagements.

Respecting the deviation of the Lancashire Line near Mr Wood’s house if you think it as advantageous, or more to my property you may agree to the alteration.

The boring as far as having gone through the 3foot 3 inches mine is satisfactory. It may be a matter of consideration what extent of trial and expense should be continued with a view of discovering an under bed.

Respecting the Pot Oven. I think the tenant should pay five per cent for the money laid out. It will be advisable to consult some person acquainted with this description of building before you give directions for it being done.

As to the old Barn Farm in Hapton, I am convinced that we cannot effect any effective improvements with the present family who have not capital sufficient to manage a farm of such extent. If some arrangement could be come to with the family, who might have a smaller farm, it would be far better for us to be at liberty to have a fresh tenant and I am convinced a farm so situated would command advantageous offers. I hope to be at Townley on the 14th or 15th of July when we can discuss the matter. It will be desirable when the lease is out to let Burnley Wood to the adjoining farm as it is much too small by itself.

Yours faithfully, P G Townley.

[The 3 foot 3 inches mine referred to above is a seam of coal in the Burnley Coal field. Townley was evidently doing exploratory boring to see whether there was another seam below this one.]


Page 43. No document.
Page 44.


NOTE TO J CLAYTON ESQ. FROM B MOONE. DATED 6TH MARCH [18]66 AT BURNLEY.

Sir, enclosed is a warrant and information which if you think right you’ll have to sign-?. I have some deeds to execute or I would have waited upon you so that you’ll pray excuse. S. Yr most humble servant, B Moone.


Page 45.


LETTER SIGNED JOHN BANNISTER, NO RECIPIENT MENTIONED, DATED 2ND AUGUST 1763 AT LONDON.

On paper.

Sir, I got well here whisterday[sic] at 3 o’clock and delivered your letter to Mr Lucas and Mr Barcroft’s letter to Mr Richison. Mr Lucas will do all in his power to get the original award and petition and he says that has he has some concern in the Duchy Office he can bring them with him to Lancaster. Mr Richison thinks he cannot have them nor will they be of any service for he says the Examined Court Copies which Mr Aspinall, clerk has with him are better evidence than the originals are. Yet if Mr Lucas can get them he must bring them for they can do no harm. Mr Richison likewise says that it is very necessary to make a search for the prior proceedings and if they can not be found, get the officer of the Duchy Court certificate and give evidence upon it if required if I had not come to London Mr Richison would have sent his clerk or some other person to Lancaster to have proved the search we have been three times at the Duchy Court but the Clerk is out of town and has been since last Saturday he was expected home whisterday but is not come yet. He is but twelve miles off and if he does not come tonight I will go for him tomorrow morning for there can be nothing done until he comes. I can not yet tell when I can set off but the moment I have done my business I will come. I hope to be at home on Monday till then Sir trust your most oblgd and humble servant to command, John Bannister.

NB. I never was out in such wether in all my life. It was never after I left Bradford till I got to Biggleswade one over but it was most prodigious hevi rain that I was as wet as if I had been in your draw well and it is a most prodigious wet day here today. I left my horse at Biggleswade and came in the coach it cost me but four shillings and sixpence and if can get business done shall have no occasion to stay in town to rest my horse.


Page 46.


A COPY OF A LETTER FOUND UNDER THE RVEREND MR OLIVER’S DOOR AT PRESTON APRIL 7TH 1766.

Sir, I make bold to acquaint you that your house and every clergyman that is in this town or any black son of a bitch like you, for you are nothing but heretics and damned souls, if William Whittle, that worthy man, hangs up ten days you may fully expect to be blown to damnation. I have nothing more material but I would desire that you make interest for him to be cut down or you may fully expect it at the ten days end.

From yours, SM WG.


Page 47.


NOTE DATED JULY THE 9TH 1762, NO RECIPIENT. SIGNED BY AMBROSE WALTON AT 8 CROWN OFFICE ROW.

Received of ? ? Godin Esq. Executor of my late Uncle Richard Emmott Esq. Deceased the sum of fifty ponds being the half yearly payment of an annuity of one hundred pounds bequeathed to me by a codicil of the last will and testament of my Uncle Christopher Emmott Esq. Deceased and due the 7th of March last.

Amb Walton.


Page 48. No document.
Page 49.


NOTE SIGNED R TOWNLEY PARKER . SEEMS TO BE DIRECTED TO FIELDEN? AND IS DATED AS ROYDE, MONDAY [1820 ADDED IN PENCIL]

Fielden, I had a letter three days since from Mr Lovat saying he had finished my plans and map and had delivered them to you. If you can direct your wife where to find them I wish you would tell her to send them by the bearer this evening. I have sent you a brace of moor game which I hope you may be able to enjoy for your dinner tomorrow; we had very bad sport today on the moor.

I am yours, R Townley Parker.

Page 50.


LETTER TO MR MURRAY? AT BURNLEY FROM ? DATED 5TH OF JUNE 1841 AT 51 SOUTHAMPTON ROW, RUSSELL SQUARE.

Dr. Murray, By George we’ve just lik’d am. A majority of one against Ministers. I have seen Revd. Mr Patten this morning and he tells me that Ministers do not intend to bring on the arguments on the Corn Law question but merely to have the necessary measures and dissolve and the Lord send us a good majority in the next parliament. Yours truly ?


Page 51.


THREE BILLS FROM THOS GRIMSHAW OF ACCRINGTON FOR MEDICINE. VARIOUS DATES AND CLIENTS.

On paper.

April 1st 1787. To William Nuttall
To a vomiting mixture, child. 8d
To two rhubarb powders 8d
¼
Accrington.

June 7th 1788. To Thomas Lawson
To three anodyne boluses 1/-
Peruvian mixture 2/-
3/-

November 7th 1790 To George Ramsbottom
A box of asthmatic pills 1/6
To a pectoral mixture 1/8
3/2

Page 52.


LETTER FROM P G TOWNLEY. UNKNOWN RECIPIENT. DATED 18TH JUNE 1846. PARK HOUSE?.


I duly received yours of the 13th. I shall be glad to know whether you have been able to settle satisfactorily with the East Lancashire Lines assistant engineer. Have you lately seen the works on the Todmorden Line. I shall be glad to know what progress they have made particularly at Copy Clough Bridge. I am not surprised the East Lancashire Company have parted with Cawley?

Yours faithfully, P G Townley.


Page 53.


LEGAL DOCUMENT SIGNED BY HENRY ROBINSON AND DATED AUGUST 8TH 1725.

On Vellum. Sealed and stamp duty paid. This doc is in Latin but I can make out that it concerns lands at Laneshawbridge, Great Knarr Persons mentioned are Thomas Proctor of Trawden and Robert Silsden? of Emmot Lane.

Page 54/55 no document.
Page 56.


COPY OF A LEGAL DOCUMENT DATED 1726 WHICH RELATES TO A PLEA FOR PAYMENT OF A BOND AGREED ON 2ND October 1725 AT YORK CASTLE.

Waller for Michaelmas 2nd Charles I. Henry Shawe, Nathaniel Hartley, Christopher Foulds, Lawrence Hartley.
James Foulds late of Hey in the County of Lancaster husbandman was summoned to answer Margaret Hartley widow in a plea that he shall surrender to her £40 which he owes her and wrongfully detains. By her attorney Richard Monks she says that on the 2nd of October 1Charles I [1625] at York castle by a deed of obligation he the said James Foulds admitted then that he was bound to her then in the sum of £40 to be paid to her when required and though often requested he has not yet rendered her the same and so far he refuses to pay whereby she has offered the loss at £20 and thereupon produces the suit ?.

The said ? by her attorney James Titherington depends etc, and prays a hearing of the said writing (of obligation) which is granted which was in these words. The condition of this obligation is such that if the above ? James Foulds his heirs administrators or assigns do well and truly perform, fulfil and keep all and singular covenants grants payments promises and agreements which on the part of the said JF had been entered and performed etc. declared in articles of agreement bearing ? with this obligation between the said Margaret Hartley and the said James Foulds according to the true intent of the said articles, that then this present obligation be ? or > effect or else ? in its full force and effect.

Which read and heard, ? prayed licence of intertreating on the Octave of St Hilary and he has it. The same day was given to the said Margaret.


Page 57 no document.
Page 58.

A LEGAL DOCUMENT ON VELLUM. DATED 23RD APRIL 29 ELIZABETH. [1587]

This appears at first sight to assign Bradley Mill to John Townley. Very obscure hand.


To all ? people to whom these present writings shall come or ? be read or heard John Woodhouse of Burnley in the county of Lancaster yeoman sendeth greetings ? lord godde everlasting in heaven our sovereign lady Elizabeth ? ? so hast by her deed indented having date the seventh day of February in the four and twentieth year of her most gracious reign [1582] given sealed and signed ? ? ? and to ? ? unto me the said John Woodhouse certain lands and tenements ……… and yearly paid the sovereign lady the rent …….. town and hamlett of Cliviger Burnley and Marsden and hereafter ? ? ? is to pay and ? land called ? in Cliviger aforesaid containing by estimation …….
………[appears to be reciting the former owners of the property to which this document refers]……………………. Called Bradley Mill with the whole of the soke and suit to the same belonging and rights appertaining now or late in the ? or occupation of Henry Baldwin[?] his heirs and assignes and one parcel of land ? ? in Burnley aforesaid containing by estimation ? and a close called Burnley Game now or late in the ? or occupation of ……………………………..
To have and to hold and ? the aforesaid lands, barns, closes ……….. to me the aforesaid John Woodhouse and my assignes from the first? Day of March…………
[appears to be detailing the yearly rent payable].And whereas, the said sovereign lady hath …………….. chappell of Burnley aforesaid called Townley Chantrey.

This hand deteriorates and I’m not sure how accurate my transcription is so I’m leaving it.


Page 59.


LEGAL DOCUMENT ON PAPER SIGNED ? , JAMY CHETHAM, ROB BOOTH, ROBT DUKINFIELD.


To all people to whom this present roll shall be seen, read or understood, we, his Majesty’s Justices of the Peace ? ? in the county of Lancaster whose names are subscribed send greetings. Whereas upon inspection of the accounts of James Tomlinson of Lancs. gent ? of the monies for carriages which attend his Majesty’s troops collected within the said county it appears to us that the sum of one hundred pounds is necessary to be raised for the payment of the said carriages. Therefore know ye that we the said Justices do order that the said sum of one hundred pounds be raised within the said county and by these presents do apportion tax as is the sum of seventy pounds five shillings together with the charges on this roll against the inhabitants of the several towns, villages, and places hereafter mentioned within the Hundred of Blackburn being their apportionable part of and do appoint and order the present High Constables of the said Hundred forthwith, on the sight hereof to collect, levy and gather by distress and sale of goods the several sums hereafter mentioned and taxed and make undelayed payment thereof to the said John Tomlinson for such carriages according to the trust reposed in him.


[then follows a list of towns and villages and the amounts to be raised therein.]

For witness whereof, we the said Justices have hereunto set our hands and seals in open ? of ? held by adjournment at Manchester in and for the said county this 24th day of July, 24 George II ? [1750]


Page 61.


CLAYTON FAMILY OF CARR HALL. NOTES FROM THE FAMILY BIBLE OF THE CLAYTONS.

John Clayton and Margaret Townley married at Colne Church by the Rvd. Mr Wilson on Monday 22 July 1754 had issue:
Thomas born Friday May 16th 1755. the sponsors were Mrs Townley of Carr Hall, his Grandmother, Doctor Clayton, his grandfather and Pierce Starkie Esq. of Huntroyd.
Richard Townley born Friday May 14th 1756 was privately baptised by the Revd Mr Ogden Curate of Blackburn, died June 27th following and was buried in the Parish Church of Blackburn.
Martha born Wednesday 30 March 1757. Was christened at Colne by the Rvd Mr Willson (the then curate) on Monday the 6th June following. The sponsors were Edmund Shuttleworth Esq. Of Horrocksford, Mrs Clayton of Breadoal in Derbyshire, her Great Aunt and Mrs Walton of Marsden. She died 30 October 1759 and was buried in the church of Colne.
Richard Townley born Monday 23rd of January 1758, was privately baptised by the Revd Mr Nabbs of the New Church in Pendle Forest and buried by him the same evening in the church of Colne.
Martha born 26th of November 1760, was christened at Colne by the Revd Mr Willson (the then curate) on ? of February following. The sponsors were Ambrose Walton Esq. Of Marsden, Miss Clayton, her aunt and Miss Martha Barcroft.
Margaret born 26th of April 1764
Margaret Clayton, mother to the above died 25th of April 1779, buried at Colne.
Thomas Clayton, only surviving son of John and Margaret Clayton married on the 11th of December 1788, Susan the daughter of Robert and Mary Nuttall of Bury in this county. Susan died 23rd of November 1789without issue and was buried at Colne.
Margaret Clayton, daughter of John and Margaret Clayton married James Chew of Billington M.D.. Died 27th of December 1827, buried at Blackburn.
Dr Chew died May 20th 1823 without issue.
John Clayton, father to the above died 17th of March 1803, buried at Colne.
Martha Clayton born 26th of November 1760 died 26th October 1834, buried at Colne on 1st November 1834.
Thomas, son of John and Margaret Clayton died at Carr Hall 13th February 1835 in the eightieth year of his age and was buried at Colne.
Elizabeth Clayton, only daughter of the above Thomas Clayton married 10th of February 1835, Edward Every, Captain in his majesties[sic] 80th Regiment, second son of Sir Henry Every, Bart. Of Eggington county Derby and had issue.
1st. Penelope eldest daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Every-Clayton, born November 13th 1835, was privately baptised by the Revd. John Henderson incumbent of Colne and christened at Colne, 28th June 1837 By the Rvd. Robert Mosley Master, of Royle near Burnley. The sponsors were Henry Every Esq., Caroline his wife and Penelope his sister.
2nd. Elizabeth, second daughter of the above Edward and Penelope Every-Clayton, born 28th of December 1836, privately baptised by the Revd. John Henderson and christened at Colne 28th of June 1837 by the Revd. R M Master. Sponsors were the Revd. Mr and Mrs Wigglesworth of Townhead, and Miss Halstead of Hood House near Burnley.
3rd. Caroline Mary born 3rd of October 1838, privately baptised by the Revd. J Henderson of Colne. Christened at Colne on the 22nd of September 1842 by the Revd. Robert Mosley Master, sponsors Mary Every, her aunt, Miss Brackenbury, William Whalley Esq. Of Clerk Hill. [near Whalley]
4th. Thomas Edward born 3rd of April 1841, privately baptised by the Rvd. R Morton of Barrowford, christened at Colne 22nd of September 1842 by the Revd. R M Master. Sponsors, Mr Hargreaves of Eabridge Lodge near Newbury, Berks., Sir Henry Every Bart. His grandfather and Thomas Lister Parker Esq..
5th. And 6th. Twins, Francis and Edward born April 29th 1843, privately baptised by the Revd. S Smith of Barrowford, christened at Barrowford the 9th ? 1846 by the Revd. R M Master incumbent of Burnley. Sponsors to Francis, Mrs Newton of Marl Hall, Cheltenham, Miss Julia Boyd, and Thomas Whitaker Esq of Holme near Burnley. Sponsors of Edward, L G N Starkie Esq. Of Huntroyd John Taylor Esq. Moreton Hall, Jane Every his aunt of Ouseley Lodge Windsor.
7th. Edith born 10th of August 1844, baptised privately by the Revd. S Smith of Barrowford, christened at Barrowford on November 9th 1846. Sponsors The Revd. R M and Mrs Master, and Miss Elizabeth Halsted of Hood Hall near Burnley.
8th. Annette born 12th of September 1846, privately baptised by the Revd. S Smith christened at Barrowford on the 9th November 1946 by the Revd. R M Master. Sponsors Edward Parker Esq. And Mrs Parker of Alkincoats and Miss Eliza Halsted of Hood House near Burnley.
9th. Henry born 17th January 1849, privately baptised by the Revd. S smith. Christened at Barrowford on the ? by the Revd. R M Master. Sponsors, Charles Carrrol Worsley Esq. Of Platt near Manchester, the Revd. John Whalley of Clerk Hill near Whalley and Mrs Fort of Read Hall near Whalley.


THE HARTLEYS OF ADMERGILL AND WHITELEE IN PENDLE FOREST.

James Hartley of Admergill in the county of York by his will dated 1642 left that estate to his son William Hartley, who’s son and heir, John Hartley of Admergill appears to have died in 1699m having had issue. Alexander, William, John, James, George, Anne and Margaret. The eldest son Alexander succeeded his father and had a son, John Hartley, who sold the Admergill estate to his uncle John Hartley in 1726.

William Hartley (second son of John, who died in 1699) married Ellen Robinson of Roughlee and was ancestor of the late William Hartley, gent, of Fence Gate in the Forest of Pendle. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Mr Nicholas Grimshaw of Higham, and he had with a son William Hartley baptised at New Church in Pendle 18th June 1797, died unmarried. The following daughters: Mary baptised 17th February 1788 died unmarried. Susannah baptised 23rd May 1790 married Mr John Robertshaw and is now resident at Fence Gate. Margaret baptised 2nd September 1792 died unmarried. Ann, baptised 8th December 1799died unmarried. Agnes, baptised 24th of April 1803 died unmarried and Ellen baptised 30th of March 1806 died unmarried.

Margaret Hartley (Third daughter of William Hartley by his wife Elizabeth Grimshaw) married Mr Henry Waddington and had issue an only son and heir, Henry Waddington Hartley Esq of Fence Gate who married Susan, daughter of Harry Bolton Esq. Of Colne, solicitor by his wife Elizabeth Ann, daughter of Henry Hargreaves Esq., of Newchurch in Rossendale. And has issue a son and daughter.

John Hartley of Newchurch in Pendle and Higher White Lee in Pendle Forest (an estate which was acquired by purchase about the close of the 17th or the beginning of the last century) was the third son of John Hartley of Admergill who died in 1699. He had issue two sons, John and George and four daughters, Jane married to Mr John Manknowles, Elizabeth married to the Revd. Mr Nabbs of Newchurch in Pendle, Mrs Cronkshaw and Mary Married to Mr Bernard Hartley of the Hague near Colne.

John Hartley, Gent., of Higher White Lee (elder son of the above John Hartley) was party to a surrender dated 17th April 1765 , the other parties being Christopher Shackleton of Stone Edge in the Forest of Pendle and Bernard Hartley of White Lee, son of the said John Hartley. Mr John Hartley died in 1770 (buried at Newchurch in Pendle 7th of March 1770having had by Elizabeth his wife, (buried at Newchurch Aug 2nd 1768) the following children: John, Bernard, James(buried 1st Feb 1759) George died unmarried, Elizabeth died unmarried, Alice, baptised 10th November 1741 married Mr Southeron of York. Catherine, baptised 8th February 1745/46 died unmarried. Mary, baptised 1st August 1747/8 buried 16th October 1748. Jane baptised 11th April 1754buried 2nd July 1759. Ellen buried 23 January 1768.

John Hartley, of Blackburn, surgeon, Late of Whitelee was eldest son of John by Elizabeth his wife. He married Ann Brooks (buried 27th December 1761) and had an only son and heir.

Revd. John Hartley D.LL. Brazenose College, Oxford, incumbent of Colne baptised at Blackburn 30th of January 1760. he was JP for the county and died unmarried at Colne May 1811 aged 51. His brother Bernard Hartley, gent of Lower Whitelee, (2nd son of John Hartley) built the present house of Lower White Lee and married Sarah, daughter of Mr William Roberts of Ightenhill by whom he had issue; John, died unmarried; James, buried April 9th 1775; William, buried 23rd December 1781; Bernard, Alexander, Jane died unmarried; Sarah married Mr James Topper of Burnley, Elizabeth married Mr John Kenyon of Accrington, Mary married Mr John Heeles of Whitebank near Bolton and Ann buried 13th March 1793.

Bernard Hartley died in May 1797 buried 18th May. His son was Bernard Hartley of Lower White Lee. He married Ellen Haworth and died in 1750, buried on 26th April aged 68 leaving an only son.

Bernard Hartley of Lower White Lee gent., was twice married. First to Miss Margaret Ann Topper by whom he had a daughter who died young. Second to Ann daughter of Mr John Grimshaw of Bank House in Higham. He died in 1858 aged 25 years buried at Fence April 23rd leaving no issue.

Alexander Hartley, younger surviving son of Bernard Hartley who died in 1797, married Maria Crook and had issue a son, Mr John Hartley, printer, Colne who now possesses the estates of Lower White Lee and Admergill; and three daughters, Alice, wife of Mr Law, surgeon of Padiham. Sarah, wife of Mr Henry Johnson of Rochdale and Jane, wife of Mr Doyle of Colne, surgeon. Mr Alexander Hartley died June 1839 and was buried June 20th aged 56 years.


TWO ORIGINAL DOCUMENTS FOLLOW. ONE A SEATING ALLOTMENT FOR BURNLEY CHURCH 1634AND THE NEXT A SEATING ALLOTMENT FOR COLNE CHURCH IN 1635. BOTH ON PAPER.


ALLOTMENT OF SEATS ETC IN COLNE CHURCH 1635.

[In fair hand on paper. Looks like a contemporary copy of the original. This is only an assumption.]

A certificate of a commission granted by the Revd. Father in God John Lord Bishop of Chester, April ye 11th 1`635 to Nicholas Mitchell, Lawrence Hargreaves, Robert Smith, John Higgin, James Robard, James Hartley of Whycollar and Henry Parker, churchwardens for ye parrish and chappelry of Colne for Allotment and Division of ye stalls, forms and seats in ye church according to ye tennor of the same Commission and now by them divided and alloted amongst ye said parishioners as followeth.

Impremis. For the stalls and forms adjoining to ye Chancell on Sun-side of ye Mid Alley they allot as followeth: The first double form at Chancel back and the second next adjoining to the length of one form, they do allot and appoint to Nicholas Townley, esq., for his house at Greenfield and the tenements of Henry Baldwin, Henry Haughton, Lawrence Hartley of Bridge End, Roland Waley and the tenement lately belonging to Henry Mancknowle of Marsden.

Impremis. The third form next adjoining, one length they do allot to John Bannister of Park Hill, gent., for his tenants at Great Hey.
Item. For the other forms at chancel back adjoining to the South Alley (that is to say:- the first double form and the second next adjoining they do appoint to Mr Lawrence Habergham for his house and lands at Foulridge Hall and Robert Emmott for his house and lands at Standroyd.
Item. The third form to the two last allotted to Mr Habergham and Robert Emmott they do allot for the ancient men of the parish to sit in.

The rank between mid alley and south alley allotted as followeth:-
Impremis. The first double-seated form through between the Alleys they do appoint to Mr Henry Doughty, gent., and William Emmott for their chief mansion houses.
Item. They do allot a stall on the south side of the great pillar to the tenants of Mr Doughty at Waterside.
Item. The second form to the pillar they do allot to William Hartley of Bradley and Alexander Parker for their mansion houses.
Item. The third form adjoining the pulpit and great pillar they allot and appoint to Richard Kippax of Marsden.
Item. The double form on the west side of the great pillar, and adjoining to the pulpit they allot to Mr Lawrence Townley of Stone Edge, for Fulshaw and pasture lands, and Edward Spencer for Lomeshaw lands.
Item. The fifth through next beneath the pulpit, they allot to Ambrose Walton for Clough-head, and William Sagar, younger, for Barkerhouse and the lands late belonging to Lawrence Willson of Bradley (viz. Lawrence Whittam, Edward Marsden and Henry Higgin.)
Item. The sixth form they allot to William Emmott for his lands in Wycollar, Robert Folds of Trawden, John Cunliffe for his wife’s lands in Winewall, Henry Shaw for his lands at Blackow, and James Hartley of Wanlas and Alexander Hartley of Blackow for his house and lands at Blackow.
Item. The seventh form they allot to John Hargreaves of Barrowford, Henry Blakey of Blackow, and Christopher Hartley of Barrowford for a house and lands bought of James Shackleton.

Item. The eight they appoint for Ambrose Barcroft for his house and tenement belonging to John Smith, tenant, Thomas Acrondly of Acrondly, Richard Holgate of Foulridge and William Hartley of Ackrondly. [sic.]

Item. The ninth they appoint to James Emmott for Delves land, and for his wife’s land, and John Bannister for his wife’s land at Southfield and Richard Hargreaves of Edge-end.

Item. The tenth they appoint to Nicholas Townley, esq., for James Ridehalgh’s tenement called Holehouses, Lawrence Ormerod of Schofield and the heirs of one Dawson, also Henden lands late belonging to Robert Rushton (that is to say) Joseph Rushton, John Lee, Edward and James Whitaker and Richard Kippax for Birdielands

Item. They appoint to James Wilson of Southfield, Gyles Hammond for Catlow lands, Robert Hargreaves for land at Southfield and Henry Lee of Catlow.

Item. The twelfth they appoint to the heirs of Christopher Folds, for lands in Barrowford, William Hanson or his wife for church lands in Colne, Nicholas Parker for part of Mittons land and Nicholas Townley esq., for Rycroft tenement at Standroyd, Henry Hartley at Barrowford for part of Mittons land and Lawrence Ormeroyd for Michael Greenwood’s house and Thos. Sutcliffe for Christopher Fold’s house in Barrowford.

Item. The thirteenth they appoint to Geoffrey Shackleton of Trawden for a house in Trawden, James Shackleton for the same, for land of James Hartley alias Lores in occupation of John Bancroft and John Hartley, son of Roger, and the lands lately belonging to Henry Hartley of Trawden viz. James Hartley for Lores lands Roger Folds Christopher Hartley, Robert Hartley of Gilford Clough for several parts of the said land and Robert Folds for James Hartley’s land.

[end of document]



THE NEXT SET OF DOCUMENTS IS DESCRIBED AS ‘GARGRAVE MANUSCRIPTS. (ORIGINALS) THERE ARE THREE DOCUMENTS:


POOR STOCK. 1758. LAND TAX ASSESSMENT 1743. TITHE COMPOSITION 1820.

THE BOOK OF ACCOUNTS FOR THE TOWN OF GARGRAVE BEGUN IN THE YEAR 1758.

George Wilson by his will gave ten Pounds, the interest thereof to be distributed to the poor of Gargrave by the vicar and churchwardens……………. 10-00-00
Thomas Brashaw by his will gave Ten Pounds
to the poor of the parish of Gargrave…………………………. 10-00-00
Richard Wainman by his will gave Forty Pounds to the said poor of Gargrave to the end that twenty shillings yearly should be distributed to those poor ? ? and the other twenty shillings to be laid out in putting out poor apprentices. 40-00-00
Thomas Smithson by his will gave Twenty Pounds the interest thereof to be paid to Maud ? Carr for her life and after her decease the same to go to the said poor of Gargrave……………………………………………………….. 20-00-00
Which said several sums of £1-18-00 the interest of those £40 1-18-00

Robert Clough and Peter Watkinson the present churchwardens of Gargrave aforesaid have called in and paid out and paid the same in part of the purchase of dowers, barns, stables, croft or garden lying in Hellifield which they purchased of Roger Preston for the sum of ninety five pounds for the ? aforesaid and to make up the said consideration money they, the said Robert Clough and Peter Watkinson have laid out and paid of their own proper monies the sum of thirteen pounds and two shillings and which above mentioned premises along with the other premises being two closes in Hellifield belonging to the said poor of Gargrave they have leased to Thomas Thornber for 21 years at the yearly rent of £14-10-00

1759.
MONEY BELONGING TO PARISH AS FOLLOWS:
[there follows a list of amounts in a very poor hand amounting to £14-10-00]

THE NEXT DOCUMENT IS A LIST OF PAYMENTS OF LAND TAX FOR GARGRAVE FOR THE YEAR 1743.

THE NEXT DOCUMENT IS A NOTE ACCOMPANIED BY A LIST OF TITHE PAYERS ON THE REVERSE. THE TEXT ON THE FRONT READS AS FOLLOWS:

Mr Lister’s compliments to Mr Buck and will thank him to collect the Tithe compositions for the town of Gargrave according to the statement on the other side and pay them at the vicarage on Friday the 1st of December

Vicarage
November 18th 1820
Page 62.

TWO LETTERS FROM EMMA M WALFORD OF 45 BERNARD STREET, WC. ONE DATED 26TH SEPTEMBER 1899, THE OTHER DATED 7TH NOVEMBER 1899.

Evidently to William Waddington and explaining her charges for transcribing documents to his order.


Page 63.

A LETTER.

My dear sir, I have not printed anything about George Marsh and probably own that?, but I take great interest in all relating to him as I have no doubt, my ancestors having been settled at Deane, that I am of the same family though I cannot trace the pedigree. I hope you will not only omit the statement that Marsh was curate to Rothwell but if you mention the former at all will take the opportunity of correcting it as I think that the adjoined extract from a letter of James Rames (to whom I had written for his authority for the statement in a note to Fastrell’s Notitia II 38) and my reply will satisfy you that the statement is an erroneous inference from a misprinted date in the ? Cantab: . Probably however with the refutation of the fact of his connection with Rothwell will dissipate any reason for mentioning him at all.

I have made from time to time notes on the subject of the martyr which would have been at your service if they had been in such a condition as to be of use to anyone but myself. But the fact is that absolutely all that is known of him is derived from Foxe and all that a biographer could now do is to disentangle the known facts from the mistaken inventions and speculations of subsequent writers and to bring to bear the facts of general history by way of illustration.

The subject of his school is one that I had not lost sight of but it can only be guessed at. It is almost a waste of time to report a statement of Baines but his invention of ‘The free Grammar School at Bolton’ is most improbable. That school was founded under the will of Robert Lever nearly a century after Marsh’s death. It is true that as early as 1622 there is recorded the gift of lands ‘To the Master of the School at Bolton’ but it will require more evidence than I am aware of to show that the school referred to was in existence in the first half of the sixteenth century and still more that it was of a class capable of affording such an education as George Marsh evidently received. What if you and I could claim him as an alumnus of our own school! Manchester founded in the year of, or possibly five years before, and Warrington founded when he was in his 11th or 12th year are the only schools I can think of in the neighbourhood and they were about equally distant from his home. But of course this is only a speculation, or if you please, a dream which may interest you as it does me. Yours faithfully, G Marsh.


[The adjoined copy letter}
Hardwick House, Chepstow. 18 April 1878.

Extract from letter of Canon Raines.

I have turned to my notes regarding George Marsh and think there is strong inferential evidence that he was Rothwell’s curate in the literal sense of the term. There is some discrepancy in Foxe’s statement, Marsh’s deposition and the ordinary biographies. Marsh seems to have been born in 1515, to have been married in 1540 and according to Cooper (Aitken: Cantab) to have commenced in A in 1542. He said before Lord Derby and Bishop Cotes in 1555 that he had received orders of the bishops of London and Lincoln. The date is not given. I infer that this last named bishop was Ridley, at Rochester 1547, London 1550, burnt 1554. The latter might be Holbeach at Libncoln1547-1551, so that Marsh could not be ordained before 1547. he is said (Baines, Lancs., I539) to have been Saunders curate at Allhallows Bread in London but he himself says that he was Saunders’ curate “for a while” at Laughton near Welford in Leicestershire. He was preaching at Deane and elsewhere in Lancashire at the time of his apprehension and on being asked by the Chancellor of Preston if he were not a priest of the Bishop of Chester’s diocese he answered equivocally and on being asked if he had not been lately at Dean and there abode he answered affirmatively and on being further asked how long he had been curate he replied he had been curate but one year. See Foxe, volume 7, part 1, page 41, Church History of England. As Marsh was a preacher in the diocese of Chester at the time of his apprehension and was summoned before the bishop and his officials and by them examined and afterward sentenced and martyred in the diocese he must necessarily have been officially connected with it and he had exercised his ministerial functions several years before he returned to Lancashire. There it is clear he had his abode and the parish was Dean and in 1555 he had been there “but one year” and as William Rothwell was vicar in 1542 and occurs as such in 1550 if not later it may be supposed that he was his curate. I took the trouble many years ago to examine all the records at the Registry at Chester likely to give me information on the proceedings against George Marsh and Chancellor Raikes had done the same with no better success.

[Letter, G F M to Canon Raines.]

The kindness with which you have gone so fully into the subject of my letter is just like you, but if I had anticipated it I should scarcely have ventured to trouble you on the single point of my enquiries. The date of Marsh’s marriage ( as deduced from Foxe’s statement of his age) was 1540 or thereabouts but it was after he had been left a widower with several children that he changed the whole purpose of his life, went through the academic course at Cambridge and was ordained. The Aitken? Cantab is therefore inconsistent with Foxe and I have no doubt 1542n is a misprint for 1552 which would be consistent with Marsh’s statement to the Earl of Derby at Lancaster that he had not dwelled in this county these three or four years past and at Lathom he had been a curate but one year. In 1552 then I take it he was ordained by Tailour, Bishop of Lincoln to the curacy of Church Laughton and Lawrence Sanders who became Rector of Allhallows 28th March 1553 and on Mary’s accession determined to hold both livings lest Laughton should fall into the hands of the Papists. He only occasionally visited Allhallows and as Marsh was curate there I infer that Sanders left him in charge of that parish in his absence and in that character he received priest’s orders from Ridley. When he mentioned at Lathom that he had received orders from the bishops of London and Lincoln his examiners spoke of them as “These New Heretics” Which they would naturally say of Ridley and Tailour. Sanders, visiting his city parish and preaching in spite of warnings was arrested by Bonner on the 15th of October 1553. Marsh’s work in London was clearly at an end and he retired into Lancashire and was living at Dean with his mother until his arrest or rather surrender on the 13th March 1554. (not 1555 as stated by Baines) Now as Rothwell retained his living during the whole of Mary’s reign, I cannot imagine him as having held such opinions as would have induced him to employ as his curate one who had been ? silenced in London and had made himself so far conspicuous as a preacher as to have been heard of there by the Earl of Derby. He was accused of having preached heretical doctrines within “The Parish of Dean” but only in the same category with “Eccles, Bolton, Bury and many other parishes within the bishop’s diocese”. This was on his first appearance before the consistory court. His answers did not deal with the places where, but the doctrine which he had preached , all parties (including the accused) losing sight in the moment of all questions except whether he would or would not recant. On his second appearance before the court the question was asked “whether he had not lately been at Dean parish in Lancashire and their abode”. It seems to me therefore, that if he preached in Lancashire at all it was not while serving as curate to Rothwell or anyone else. It was in consequence of what Lord Derby had heard of him in London that search was made for him at Dean and on his first examination at Lathom he said that by laws now used in this realm so far as he knew he was no priest and that he had ministered with a good conscience and if the laws of the realm would have suffered him he would have ministered still and if the laws would at any time thereafter suffer him to minister after that sort he would minister again. I think the inference from this is that he had so far yielded obedience to the existing authorities as to abstain from public and formal preaching. I hope you will not consider me pertmacious [sic] if in these reasons I hold it not proved that George Marsh was Rothwell’s curate or held any cure in Lancashire. I also had searched at Chester many years ago but fear that there is no evidence acceptable except the authors named in your letter. It was the fear, or the hope, that there were authorities with which I was unacquainted which induced me to trouble you with my enquiry. A statement of Baines I should have passed by without notice but when the B is replaced with an R the case is altered.


DOCUMENT REGARDING AN ANNUITY DUE TO ROBERT MUNN?

On paper and in a fair hand, easily readable.


Page 64.

A MAP ON LINEN OF THE CENTRE OF BURNLEY SHOWING THE AREA ROUND THE PARISH CHURCH AND THE SPARROWHAWK HOTEL.


Page 65.

LEGAL DOCUMENT ON PAPER DATED 7TH OCTOBER, 12 GEORGE II [1738]

Manor of the Halmot Court of the most noble John Duke of Montagu of Colne in the county of Lancaster? There the seventh day of October in the twelfth year of the reign of our sovereign lord King George the second over Great Britain and beyond Lawrence Robinson gentleman, Deputy Steward of Thomas ? Esq. ? ?.

BE IT REMEMBERED that the seventh day of October in the year of our Lord 1738 found Thomas Procter of Trawden and Robert Dickson late of ? but now of Monkroyd within Foulridge both within the county of Lancaster yeoman at the special insistence, request and demand of William Deal(?) of Trawden aforesaid Batchelor who is son and heir of William Deal late of ? and Kildwick within the county of York husbandman deceased for divers good cause and consideration ? the said Thomas Procter and Robert Dickson who was ? in trust of the last will and testament of the said William Deal departed, thereunto ? have seconded into the hands of the said Lord of the Manor Lawrence Robinson Gentleman Deputy Steward those ? and capital messuage and dwelling house and four roods of land to the same belonging and one other house near adjoining and barn and other belongings at Laneshawbridge within the manor aforesaid and all those closes, ? or pastures of land called or known by the several names of the Narroyd, the Starroyd, the Hag Jug, the Groats Holm, the Tupholm. And also four acres of the common lying and being upon the Great Knarr all which said properties are situate, lying and being at Laneshawbridge and Knarr within the Manor aforesaid and now in the ? or possession of James Crabtree or his assignes together with all ? waters, water?, easements, profits, rights, ? and appurtenances to the said belonging or in any wise appertaining to his yearly rent to the Lord of the said Manor of five shillings and eightpenceTo the use and behoof of the said William Deal and desires to admit him to the said etc.? Proclamation hereof made etc. and ? him forbid thou those provided aforesaid with the appointed to the said William the son are granted by the said steward. To Have and to Hold to his sons, heirs and assignes for ever according to the custom of the said Manor. Yielding therefore to the Lord of the said Manor and his heirs the rents and services therefore as formerly due and of right mentioned and now he gives to the said Lord ? ? by the badge of Geoffrey Shackleton

Examined by ?.


SCG/08 January 2001
18,488 words
Ian

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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by plaques » 11 Jul 2014, 19:24

PanBiker wrote:Page 64.

A MAP ON LINEN OF THE CENTRE OF BURNLEY SHOWING THE AREA ROUND THE PARISH CHURCH AND THE SPARROWHAWK HOTEL.
Some years ago I was trying to find the owners of what was then the 'Parker's Arms' which later became the 'Talbot'. Would it be possible to post an image of this map to see if this Inn was positioned in the same place?

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Stanley
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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by Stanley » 12 Jul 2014, 03:41

Sorry P, if I ever copied it I can't find it....
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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by Stanley » 15 Dec 2014, 06:09

Bumped
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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by Moh » 15 Dec 2014, 10:51

Wow! That is very interesting - must make more time to read it all.
Say only a little but say it well.

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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by Gloria » 15 Dec 2014, 16:37

So must I Moh, I have found a reference to a couple of mine which warrants a proper read.
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Re: Calendar of Lancashire Documents

Post by Stanley » 16 Dec 2014, 04:59

There's so much buried in the archives.... I just had a fancy to revive a couple.
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