A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

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Stanley
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A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by Stanley » 22 Sep 2017, 09:59

A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Once more food waste is in the news as prices rise and our future looks uncertain. Unfortunately we have educated generations of younger people into believing that if the 'sell-by' date on food is passed it immediately becomes poisonous and a danger to life! How often have you selected a perfectly edible item and on reaching the checkout have been informed that they can't sell it because it's out of date? Anyone over a certain age knows with certainty that this is nonsense and a waste of perfectly good food. I see there are murmurings in some quarters suggesting that supermarkets should have a section designated as 'buy at your own risk' and I fully approve. I was taught by my mother to use my eyes and my nose and that a layer of mould on top of home-made jam was 'just penicillin' and only needed skimming off. After all we welcome the mould in blue cheese and relish the taste. I grew up healthy with no allergies and suspect that this healthy attitude to food had something to do with it!
When food is regarded even by me as waste it still has a value. There was a time when we allowed the collection of waste food from school kitchens, institutions and and hotels to be boiled and converted into pig swill, a valuable source of nutrition. In 2003 the European Union banned the use of swill in response to the Foot and Mouth outbreak of 2001. It would have made far more sense to continue its use but inspect the processing of it far more rigorously. Instead it now has to be either incinerated or dumped in landfill, each of these is bad for the environment. Marshall's at Bradley ran a successful pig-feeding operation for years based on regular collections of waste food which was boiled with skim milk and ground barley to make a lovely porridge that smelled good enough for human consumption and the pigs loved it. I used to deliver skim milk to them and saw the operation and it was a lovely use of a valuable resource.
Modern production control methods and recording are routinely used in the dairy and food processing industries and there is no reason why the same technology can't be used in pig feeding. One thing is certain, it would make economic sense for the industry as the prices of feed rise and pigs are fed on food diverted from the human food chain.
There is another precedent, the concept of the 'cottage pig'. At one time it was common for a family to keep a pig or some hens and feed them all the food waste from the house with the addition of some cereals. Once a year the pig was killed and salted and the resulting bacon and ham kept well and was a valuable part of the diet. I have been the recipient of bacon from this source during my life and it beat the shop version hands down! Waste not want not!

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The cottage pig.
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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by PanBiker » 22 Sep 2017, 10:26

We have a share in a Silsden pig, your photo looks very similar to where ours will be reared. Better make some room in the freezer. :extrawink:
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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by BillHowcroft » 22 Sep 2017, 20:38

My first employer was Billy Butlins who had their own pig farm and collected all the swill from the camp kitchens.
I thought the swill collection got linked to one of the pig diseases getting transferred between farms.

I agree with Stanley's views on healthy exposure to bacteria and I try to get a bit of earth with my homegrown a an added source of minerals.

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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by Stanley » 23 Sep 2017, 02:53

Then there are the other micro-nutrients and minerals in good soil. You can be too clean! I never peel vegetables if the skin is not blemished, boiling water sterilizes them and there is more nutrition in the skin.
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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by chinatyke » 23 Sep 2017, 15:08

Found this amusing- I opened the <new posts> today and saw "What did we have for tea?" - The topic directly below it was "A load of Pig Swill" :biggrin2:

I took a screenshot but haven't been able to find it on my computer, the joys of Windoze 10, it's so easy on a Mac.

[image]https://screenshots.firefoxusercontent. ... 1a69ae.png[/image]

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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by Stanley » 24 Sep 2017, 02:03

The swill Marshall's used to feed at Bradley was definitely good enough to eat!
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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by Bodger » 24 Sep 2017, 07:13

As a nipper in Yorkshire my mates uncle had pigeons he kept in a hut in his pen"not a biro", he also kept a pig for killing and had built a set pot for cooking pig swill, we often raided it for boiled spuds and other things, to date 70+ yrs. later i haven't felt the ill effects !!

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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by BillHowcroft » 24 Sep 2017, 21:21

My farmer colleague says they used to get scrap biscuits as pig swill when he was a kid and they used to sort out some of the better ones for themselves. His dad still has one pig and the house next to his is unoccupied with an orchard. He was loading windfall plums into a wheelbarrow as a treat for it.

When we had the rural house in Spain here was a fig tree in the bottom corner. The wild pigs in the surrounding scrub go mad for figs and the piglets would start under the chainlink fence and the parents would then expand the gap. Once they'd finished off the figs they would root through the flower beds where it was damp and had bulbs and worms. Very destructive.

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Re: A LOAD OF PIG SWILL

Post by Stanley » 25 Sep 2017, 03:25

We used to deliver a lot of skim milk and whey to Rex Patterson's pig feeding operation at Birstall. They got waste from biscuit factories and manufacturers of chocolate and confectionery. We often brought home bags of broken biscuits, misshapen chocolates and sweets for the kids. When they fed chocolate to the pigs in the sweat boxes it melted and the pigs used to be covered in it......
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