DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Tizer
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tizer »

No, and I couldn't find anything on google.

I often use the word perhaps but have never thought where it comes from. Collins shows it derived from 16th Century (presumably English, it doesn't specify a language), from per = by and happes = chance.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

Thinking back to Mrs Tiz's mother and the 'pokey hat'. I remembered that early versions of ice cream were called 'hokey pokey'.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Tripps covered hokey pokey and ice cream recently in a post in this thread. See the link in his post.
LINK
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by chinatyke »

Tizer wrote: 04 Oct 2018, 09:20 No, and I couldn't find anything on google.

I often use the word perhaps but have never thought where it comes from. Collins shows it derived from 16th Century (presumably English, it doesn't specify a language), from per = by and happes = chance.
We still retain hap/happe in local dialect when we say happen, as in happen it will rain this afternoon.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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:good:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy »

Here's three new words I came across today, I know what they mean, do you?
Twiffler... Numpty... and Ombrifuge.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

No I don't Cathy, never come across them and I shan't look them up, all will become clear without that if I know the members!
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Wendyf »

I've heard numpty used quite a lot to describe someone who does something stupid. It sounds quite affectionate doesn't It? No idea about the other two.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I didn't read it well enough! I too have come across 'numpty' but like Wendy, no knowledge of the other two.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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It is Stanley but we are well sheltered from southerly winds.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I assume the same meaning for numpty as the one Wendy describes. I had to look up the other two:
► Show Spoiler
The novel I'm reading is set in the late 1800s and I had to look up `dundrearies'.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Tripps »

Numpty is a nice word - it's a sort of an insult, but still a bit 'cuddly' - you can use it and emerge with your nose still intact. . :smile: It's a favourite of Andrew Neil the master political interviewer.

Never heard of Obrifuge - but I have now!

Similar is febrifuge recalled from childhood, as a fever reducing medicine.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Cathy »

Well that's that then I guess, no need to have fun explaining any of them
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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It would be interesting to know the situation in which you heard them used, Cathy, instead of us relying on the dictionary definition. They might mean something different in Australia! :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Tripps wrote: 12 Oct 2018, 09:15 Numpty is a nice word - it's a sort of an insult, but still a bit 'cuddly'
A bit like velleity?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

Never heard of that either!
I used 'slape' this morning, old word for slippy but it's years since I heard it used.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Misogyny has now been joined by a new word in the news, misandry, for hatred of men.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

I heard that as well Tiz on Woman's Hour where they are discussing LGBT matters. First time I have heard it.
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley wrote: 17 Oct 2018, 02:27 Woman's Hour where they are discussing LGBT matters.
Do keep up. :smile: From today's 'The Conservative Woman' blog -

Newsflash: the key challenges for the BBC, as identified by Stonewall, include ‘lack of LGBT visibility’ – as though that self-serving organisation would reach any other conclusion. The Beeb reports that employees who are LGBT (which is formally to be replaced by the more inclusive LGBTQ+) experience a ‘heteronormative culture, particularly around language in the workplace’; furthermore, ‘inclusive language, particularly around non-binary gender, isn’t always used, particularly by our third party suppliers’.

I love the word 'heteronormative' so 21st century. :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I thought the G in LGBT was for people like me - until I found out it stood for Gay and not for Ginger-haired! :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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I'll stick to my woman's hour.... such a common sense programme...
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

Have we considered 'lish' meaning supple? It slipped out of my lips yesterday while climbing on and off examination couches. Is it common or local to Yorkshire?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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Stanley wrote: 18 Oct 2018, 02:14 I'll stick to my woman's hour.... such a common sense programme...
A science professor I knew well inherited a cottage on the Scillies and retired there. He then told us his best discovery was Woman's Hour! :smile:
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

Post by Stanley »

I think it's one of the best things on the radio!
Anyone got any thoughts on 'lish'?
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Re: DIALECT AND WORD MEANINGS

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None here.
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